Cycling past the windfarm, Morham Church and rowing regatta

Out cycling last week, I took a new route, going through Cockburnspath (pr Co’burnspath or Co’path), up the hill, across the dual carriageway and on to the Coldingham road. There’s a steep climb after you cross over Pease Dean and you climb for 2+ miles. At the top of the hill, you start to see the concrete windmills turning. This is Drone Hill Windfarm which was built with the past 2 years. There are 9 windmills on each side, although they bear no comparison to the gently turning wooden windmills that you see in rural parts of the UK and Holland. These windmills look menacing. Firstly, there is a little cockpit at the top, with 2 antennae coming out of the top. This appears to be a small head with large eyes and tentacles. The winds are at the back of the cockpit, giving the impression that these might be malevolent angels (depends what you believe about angels) who are definitely watching you, and ready to slice you in half if you get too near. My cycling mates and I always agree that the windmills should be counted i.e. just in case they might be reproducing.

When out cycling, we have often passed the sign for Morham Church. When you look down the lane to which the sign is pointing, there is no sign of a church building. On Saturday, we ventured down the winding lane, past a couple of large houses and came to the church at the bottom of the hill. The church, which dates from the 10th century, is sited on land which used to be a castle, is small and has little decoration inside. There is a panel inside the church showing a copy of part of the church wall from the 9th century – this is held in the National Museum of Scotland. the gravestones are also interesting, with many of them having a skull and bones (but not cross bones) on them. You can see photos of these here. Photo 1 shows the information board as you enter the church’s grounds.

At the weekend, there was a rowing regatta outside Dunbar harbour. One of my cycling mates is involved, so we went to see the event. The skiffs have 4 people rowing, plus a cox. The competition was between 10 teams of rowers from the south of Scotland. Competitive rowing is fairly new and most boats are built by local people. Photo 2 (from a distance) shows the skiffs in action. Photo 3 shows one of the crews going out of the harbour to join a race. Photo 4 shows creels in the foreground, with the lifeboat and a skiff in the background. It was perfect weather for rowing – sunny with a slight east wind. Photo 5 shows a close up of a female lobster, part of an informative display on the harbourside.

Morham Church sign

Morham Church sign

Rowing skiffs at Dunbar

Rowing skiffs at Dunbar

Rowing skiff at Dunbar harbour

Rowing skiff at Dunbar harbour

Creels at Dunbar harbour

Creels at Dunbar harbour

Female lobster

Female lobster

 

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One Response to “Cycling past the windfarm, Morham Church and rowing regatta”

  1. binaere optionen Says:

    Fine way of telling, and nice article to take information about my presentation subject, which
    i am going to deliver in school.

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