Winter storm, Belhaven Bridge and sawmill

Last week, we had a winter storm which brought very strong winds down from the Arctic and this was accompanied by a big tidal surge. With 4 hours to go to high tide, the water was lapping the short promenade which we see from our back garden. Fortunately, there’s a wall, the road to the gold course, and a steep slope up to our house. As the waves piled in one after another, with the incoming waves being rugby tackled by the outgoing waves, there were great crashes and water leapt high in the air. When the incoming waves broke the tackles, they slammed into the promenade wall and di mighty Fosbury Flops 30 feet in the air. Photos 1 and 2 show the waves in action. A high tide is always a boon for local seagulls and they gathered in large groups, feeding frantically as the tide came in and, when a big wave approached, they wheeled as one into the air and glided in the wind – they looked to be enjoying the feast – see Photo 3.

We were driving west out of town and stopped at Belhaven beach (scroll down to walk) to see the high tide and it was well beyond its normal stopping point. I was also interested to see the Bridge to Nowhere as Belhaven bridge is known when the tide is in and the bottom steps of the bridge are covered. When we got there, it appeared at first glance as if the bridge had gone somewhere! The tide was so high and the pulsating water was so vigorous that the bridge had almost disappeared – see Photos 4. At low tide, the bridge looks like a normal bridge over a fairly shallow estuary and at sunset, it can be quite beautiful – see Photo 5. So, an exciting day for anyone who loves seeing the great power of the sea and the waves’ acrobatics.

A visit to Tyninghame Sawmill this week as I’m putting up shelves in the garage. One aspect of the sawmill that I like is the smell of the wood when it has been cut on one of the sawmill’s large electric saws. There is wood in a variety of states at the sawmill – logs, planks, batons, stakes and fence posts. I took my camera and shot dead tree trunks next to live ones (Photo 6) and a stack of wood showing a wide variety of patterns and colours in the wood (Photo 7).

Crashing waves in Dunbar

Crashing waves in Dunbar

Crashing waves in Dunbar

Crashing waves in Dunbar

Seagull feeding frenzy

Seagull feeding frenzy

Belhaven Bridge almost submerged

Belhaven Bridge almost submerged

Belhaven Bridge at sunset

Belhaven Bridge at sunset

Dead trees and live trees

Dead trees and live trees

Wood patterns and colours

Wood patterns and colours

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Tags: , , , , , ,

One Response to “Winter storm, Belhaven Bridge and sawmill”

  1. Whitesands cross country and Belhaven Beach walk | James Herring's Weekly Blog Says:

    […] fast and covers the bridge’s steps. You can see two contrasting views of Belhaven Bridge from a previous post. You can walk for about 5k along the beach and back, or you can walk around the John Muir Country […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: