Museum of Flight and honeysuckle

Our Australian visitors Bob and Robyn came for the weekend and asked if we could all go to The Museum of Flight which is about 11 miles/18K from Dunbar. The museum is built on a former airfield at East Fortune which was used during the First World War when dirigibles/airships  landed there. There are now several huge hangars which feature different kinds of aeroplane and aspects of flying. Our first stop was the Concorde Experience where you can see one of the Concordes which flew across the Atlantic. It is a wonderful design with its smooth curves, pointed nose and streamlined wings, so it is a very impressive sight. You can go inside this most luxurious of all modern planes, with its celebrity passengers, champagne and fine food but when you do go inside, your realise that this was  a plane built in the 1970s (and flew until 2003) as the seating, by comparison with today’s business class seats, looks uncomfortably small. It seems that many people went on Concorde to be seen flying on Concorde. This is not to denigrate the great advances in technology achieved at the time by the plane manufacturers. What has not happened is that the technology of Concorde did not develop in the same way as, for example, computers in the 1990s and 2000s. The hopes of newer versions of Concorde flying supersonic to Australia in half the time it takes now, never materialised.

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Concorde and model plane at the Museum of Flight

In the other hangars were examples of military aircraft as well as earlier planes including autogyros which, when you stand next to them and see how small and flimsy they look, might put you off trying to fly one.

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Autogyro at Museum of Flight

One disappointing aspect for me was that there were no examples of the first aeroplanes to fly. My memory of taking my young sons to this – much smaller – museums in the 1980s was that they had examples of some of the first planes to fly in the UK.

In my garden, the honeysuckle – proper name Lonicera – has put on its full show of subtle colours and intriguing shapes. In his poem The Wild Honeysuckle, Philip Freneau writes “Fair flower, that dost so comely grow…Untouched thy honied blossoms blow”. In Robert Frost’s poem To Earthward, he writes – of love – “I had the swirl and ache/
From sprays of honeysuckle”. The photos below show “comely” the honeysuckle is and their “sprays” (a very expressive word) can take on the look of the tentacles of coral. The variety of colours is superb but these are not brassy flowers, such as begonias, but have understated but most attractive colours. The scent of the honeysuckle, especially after rain, is charming.

Honeysuckle in full flower

Honeysuckle in full flower

Honeysuckle spray

Honeysuckle spray

Honeysuckle spray

Honeysuckle spray

 

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