Trip to Tokyo (2):National Museum of Japan and National Museum of Western Art

While in Tokyo, I had the chance to visit two of the many museums in the city. The first visit was to the splendid Tokyo National Museum. It is a beautiful building and has a very attractive entrance – a large pond with water lilies and on the day I visited, the building was reflected in the water.

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Tokyo National Museum

This is a very large museum with separate buildings for some collections, so I only got to see the collections in the main building. There is a useful YouTube video of the museum. At the start of the permanent collection, there is some early pottery on show, as well as some sacred statues which are very elegantly designed and have intricate detail.

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Early Japanese pottery

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Religious statue in Tokyo National Museum

One of the most striking artefacts in the museum is the range of 18th and 19th century kimonos. Kimonos change according to the seasons and the one below is a 19th century hitoe which was worn in June and September. The kimonos on display in the museum are very ornate and  were presumably worn by the richer women in Japan.

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19th century hitoe kimono

In the ceramics section, there are many examples of beautiful plates, many featuring flowers, as in the one shown below, also from the 19th century. The photo shows the range of colours on the plate but when you see this plate close up, the colours are far more striking and makes you appreciate the quality and precision of the artwork.

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19th century large dish with flowering plants

My next venue was the National Museum of Western Art which is also in the vast Ueno Park. The museum’s building was designed by Le Corbousier and is a stunning example of modern architecture. As with the other museum, there are many rooms to visit and you can only appreciate part of the collection in one visit. I always find that spending one hour in an art gallery is long enough if all the paintings are not to blur into each other. If you need to see more, make a return visit. As you would expect, there were many memorable paintings and pieces of sculpture but the first one  that stood out for me was Rodin’s St John the Baptist Preaching. This presents you with a tall, imposing, muscular figure with one arm outstretched. The detailed bearded face and the strong body show why Rodin’s sculptures are so widely admired, not just as craft but also as art.

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Rodin’s St John the Baptist Preaching

The second piece was a painting by the French artist Andre Bauchant entitled Canal in Alkmaar. What attracted me to this painting  was the clarity of the depiction of the canal. The photo below can’t capture the stunningly clear canal, trees and boats. This is one of these paintings that when you stand really close, you can see the myriad daubs of paint on the canvas, and it is only when you stand back that you appreciate the way the artist has captured the view and the brilliant reflections in the water.

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Andre Bauchant Canal in Alkmaar

I would highly recommend both museums to visitors to Tokyo and on a hot and very humid day in Tokyo, they were not only a haven of culture but also an escape into welcome air conditioning.

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