Keith Brockie exhibition and El Retiro Park in Madrid

The latest exhibition at Waterston House in Aberlady is by the renowned Scottish wildlife artist Keith Brockie. I featured Keith’s work on the blog  two years ago, having visited his last exhibition. The new show of paintings is equally stunning and there is a superb display of artistry here, particularly in the detailed portrayal of lapwings and hares. Keith kindly sent me 2 samples from this exhibition. The first painting features a lapwing  which is also called a Peewit, due to its call which you can listen to here (scroll down to audio). The painting perfectly captures the lapwing’s delicate colours and instantly recognisable tuft on its head. There are many superb paintings of lapwings in the exhibition and I particularly liked the ones with the lapwing sitting on its nest. The portrait of the ram is equally eye-catching and you have to admire the sheer tenacity of the painter to capture the detail of the hairs on the sheep’s face and what look like carvings on its magnificent horns. When the rutting season comes, I’m sure that this individual would emerge victorious.

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Lapwing and ram by Keith Brockie (Click to enlarge all photos)

The second painting is what I have entitled “Determined hare” as there is a steely look in the hare’s eyes. A close up of view of this and other hare portraits in the exhibition demonstrates Keith Brockie’s ability to capture the finest features of this beautiful animal. Look at the white whiskers, the oval nose and the small, puckered mouth and the brilliant contrast between the light and dark patches on the hare’s skin. The use of light and dark has challenged painters down the centuries and Keith Brockie makes superb use of this feature here. The exhibition is on until 15th November, so go and see it if you possibly can. We’ll be revisiting Waterston House before then.

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Determined hare by Keith Brockie

We recently spent a week in the Spanish capital Madrid (good photos) and what an impressive city it is. Madrid is a busy metropolis and the city centre is heavy with traffic for most of the day. However, just around the corner from the busy roundabout at the Palacio de Cibeles (video) is El Retiro Park (good photos), a vast green space which is easily accessible. The park has a 4k perimeter and is a favourite place for runners at all times of the day. It’s also a very peaceful place during the week when it is quieter. Most of the park consists of avenues of trees, bushes and hedges with walkways in between. Here we met a man playing a large harp.

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Harp player in El Retiro Park, Madrid

And we passed a puppet show where a group of children sat enthralled by the singing, storytelling and puppetry of a white haired, smiling puppet master.

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Puppet show in El Retiro Park, Madrid

Inside El Retiro Park are more formal gardens e.g. the Los Jardines de Cecilio Rodriguez (good photos). I made a short video on my mobile phone which you can download here. This is a very relaxing area, with its neatly trimmed hedges, little fountains, covered walkways and beautiful flowers, as in the photo below, taken on a lovely sunny day in Madrid with the temperature at a very pleasant 26 degrees. The topiary in the gardens is very impressive, with avenues of neatly shaped columns.

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Inside Los Jardines de Cecilio Rodriguez, Madrid

There are peacocks and peahens strolling around the gardens, ignoring the photographers and looking haughtily away from what I’m sure they regard as uncouth human onlookers. The peahen below is a good example. It could well have come straight out of a Keith Brockie exhibition, with its keen eye, exquisitely shaped feathers and a tuft that a lapwing would die for.

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Peahen in Los Jardines de Cecilio Rodriguez, Madrid

 

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2 Responses to “Keith Brockie exhibition and El Retiro Park in Madrid”

  1. tamtennis Says:

    If you search green plover on Wikipedia in the first paragraph under Northern lapwing it says that it is called lapwing due to its habit of pretending to have a broken wing and luring predators away from the nest. I got done by that very tactic out at Spikey in my yoof!

  2. jherring Says:

    Ah Tam. The Wikipedia entry is probably by a fellow egg snatcher and blower from way back. The Oxford Dictionary is more reliable, with “Old English hlēapewince, from hlēapan ‘to leap’ and a base meaning ‘move from side to side’ (whence also wink); so named because of the way it flies. The spelling was changed in Middle English by association with lap and wing”. This is verified by other sources. The moral is that you should never trust Wikipedia as the sole source, as I used to tell my students.

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