Tulips and pansies come to the fore

We had the snowdrops first, then the crocuses, then the daffodils, but now it is time for the annual tulip and pansy bonanza, and static parade. Tulips are flowers which range from the small and delicately shaded red/white or maroon/yellow, but these are the mere handmaidens and male attendants to the big, bold (and some might think brash) dominant leaders (male and female – who can tell?) in the garden. Look at the photo below, from one of the pots at the back of our house and you see both kinds of tulip – small but beautifully shaded and tall and imposing. The tall flowers have that look-at-me-and-wonder posture – see my height, my elegant stem and powerful colouring.

Large and smaller tulip in my garden pots. (click on all photos to enlarge)

I always advise people not just to admire the tulip flower, but to look inside the tulip head. Here we find something very attractive to pollinators but quite malevolent looking. The next photo shows a very elegant yellow tulip with an intriguing middle section. The yellow pistil is the focal point of attraction for bees but the background, which is feather-like or maybe made out of cat’s fur (see enlarged version), provides a stunningly delicate background.

Inside a tulip head

When you go closer up, you can also see the dark anthers which stretch out like antennae, maybe sensing the air for undesirable visitors. If you take this photo on its own, it could come out of a horror movie and represent an alien structure ready to entice unsuspecting humans – a much inferior species – into its deathly folds. Or it could be a superb piece of surrealist art representing, well… whatever you want it to.

Surreal inside of a tulip

Pansies may be further down the pecking order in terms of height and presence in the garden but they have now come into their own, waiting for a bit of heat to expand their size and colour range. The more modest pansies sit below the tall, elegant tulips but they are waiting their time, knowing that the tulips will age quickly and that even a strongish wind will shatter the tulip heads.

In my garden, I have a variety of colours of pansies. Firstly, the purple and white version. You might think that this flower is made up of butterfly wings, given the shape and delicate colours in the mainly white parts, and the bolder, deeply-veined purple sections. Then see the bright yellow centre, which attracts insects for pollination. For a detailed description of the female and male parts of a pansy, see here.

Strikingly coloured pansy flower

In this photo of a pot of pansies, the bright colours of the pansies are offset with the perhaps duller green of the foliage, but nature needs contrast as the flowers stand out more against the green. I like the variety of colours in this one pot – blue, purple, white and yellow – all artistically gathered together.

Pansies in a clay pot

The final photo shows the yellow pansy with the very dark centre, perhaps reminiscent of the dark inside of the tulip head. The sun is on the flower and the shadow of one petal against another gives an extra dimension to picture. All the petals are neatly folded against each other and there is an elegant flow to the flower head, although this flow goes in different directions. Looking at tulips and pansies close up is very rewarding and it is something we should do more often.

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