Memorial service for NZRAF officers and Aikengall II windfarm

We were recently given an invitation by Community Windpower to attend the unveiling of a stone to commemorate the crashing of a Beaufighter aircraft (good photos) in 1945. The crash took place in the Lammermuir Hills about 8 miles from Dunbar. The crew on board the plane were two young New Zealanders Harry Rice and Aubrey Clarke, as shown in the accompanying booklet below. The airmen were stationed at the RAF training camp at East Fortune and were flying the huge Beaufighter when their radio failed and they lost contact with their base. The loss of the radio was vital as navigation depended on it and the young New Zealanders – thousands of miles from home – crashed at Middle Monynut, a remote part of the Lammermuir Hills. On and around this site, Community Windpower have developed the windfarm which stands there today.

Commemoration booklet front page (Click on all photos to enlarge)

The second page of the booklet – below – shows the two young airmen in their uniforms. What is striking about the first photograph is that it captures a presumably off duty Harry Rice with a cigarette in his left hand. It is likely that airman Rice was smoking would not have been commented on at the time. There is an excellent account of the ceremony and speeches, with good photographs, by George Robertson of Dunbar Community Council on the Council website.

Two NZRAF airmen in WW2

At the end of the memorial service, there were flypasts by a modern Typhoon aircraft and then a Harvard, an aircraft that the 2 airmen might have flown if they had survived. The Typhoon photo below (taken by George Robertson) captures the modern aircraft and the recently installed, so ultramodern, wind turbine. My own photo of the Harvard follows the Typhoon.

Typhoon flypast at Middle Monynut
Harvard flypast at Middle Monynut

The memorial service took place in the Aikengall II windfarm and this is a remarkable place to be. You are high up in the hills, surrounded mainly by heather covered land. While some sheep are seen grazing, the new feature of the land is the huge wind turbines, which swoosh their mechanical limbs relentlessly around. During the service, you could hear the insistent noise made by the turbines, but nature intervened in the minute’s silence, when an unseen lark could be heard singing, as if to say that nature had not given up on this area and would still be there long after the turbines. The photo below shows a nearby turbine and its duplicate neighbours, all singing the same whooshing song.

Aikengall II Community Windfarm

I made a video of the windfarm just after the memorial service and I hope you can feel the remoteness of the area and the dominance of the turbine army, which you feel might just be capable of self-duplication.

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