Archive for the ‘eating out’ Category

Ditchling Beacon and Ditchling village

January 25, 2017

During our trip to London, we ventured south from Thames Ditton, where our rellies stay, to the village of Ditchling, an hour’s drive away. Before going into the village, we headed up the steep hill, passing a few cyclists straining hard, to Ditchling Beacon (good photos). This historical site – a hill fort was found by archaeologists – has 360 degrees views across Sussex. On the day we visited, we could see the sea behind Brighton to the south but we couldn’t see the coast of France. The Beacon is on the South Downs and you can see for miles across the rolling countryside. The Downs are made mainly of chalk and it was a new experience for us to walk on the creamy coloured clay. It had been snowing the previous day and there were quite large – but headless – snowmen to be seen next the icy path. The bitterly cold wind ensured that we didn’t stay long as, unlike the groups of walkers we saw, we were not dressed for the conditions. The photos show part of the Beacon and the snow still lying there.

img_1201

Ditchling Beacon paths

img_1202

Snow on Ditchling Beacon

The village of Ditchling has a long history and there are some very attractive Tudor-style houses in the main street. Our first stop was to the jewellers  Pruden and Smith where my sister in law wanted to buy a necklace. I wouldn’t normally stop for long in a “goldsmiths, silversmiths and jewellers” but we were given a short tour of the workshop below the main shop. What you find here is a small space which features a few work desks,  but also on display are the tools of the craftsmen and craftswomen who make the jewellery. The first photo shows a dazzling range of tools and it’s interesting to reflect that these tools, some of which are quite powerful, are instrumental in producing such delicate jewellery (see shop website for examples), along with the combination of the well-honed skills and artistic talents of those making the jewellery.

img_1203

Silversmiths’ tools in Ditchling

The second photo shows some of the older equipment used to roll out the silver and gold into which a variety of precious stones would be inserted. There was also an admirable display of jewellery on display in the cabinets. So an interesting visit to the shop and an excellent insight into the extensive and delicate work that goes into producing the rings, necklaces and bracelets.

img_1204

Rolling and printing equipment in the Pruden and Smith workshop in Ditchling

Our next stop was Ditchling Museum of Art and Craft which featured work by Eric Gill, whom I knew as a famous typographer from the 1920s and 1930s. Some of Gill’s typography is on display and I’d like to have seem more. I learned that Gill was also an accomplished sculpture and one of his works, with its beautiful flowing lines and delicate depiction of the woman’s face, is shown below.

img_1206

Eric Gill sculpture in Ditchling Museum

Also on display were examples from the Kelmscott Press founded by William Morris. There was an example of an old press, along with typefaces on display and you could see how intricate a task it was to put in letters individually – and upside down – to make a page of a book or newspaper.

img_1207

Printing press at Ditchling Museum

We had an excellent lunch at The Bull pub in the village. The pub has some very good examples of local beer from its own Bedlam Brewery. The food was impressive and I had a very tasty venison pie with chestnut mash and broccoli. It rained on and off on our stay in Ditchling but we managed a walk around this very attractive village, which is well worth a visit.

Highlights of 2016

December 31, 2016

I was going to give myself a festive break from the blog but, every day in the paper there is some sort of review of 2016, so coming back from my walk today I thought I might do one as well. This is what went through my head: best photo, best meal cooked, best restaurant, best visit, best novel read, best book of poems read, best …. Not to mention major highlights such as the arrival of our new grandson Zachary Buddy in June and in the previous month, the glorious victory – the Hibees won the cup after 114 years! So I started to read the blog from the beginning of January and realised that it was going to take a long time to read all of the posts. So this is a flick through, fairly randomly and not covering all the categories mentioned above.

In January, we went down to London as I was going to the T S Eliot Prize poetry readings at The Royal Festival Hall. I’m going again in January, so more of that later. A highlight of the visit was a meal at The French Table in Surbiton. The meal was delicious and one of the dishes on offer was monkfish which was served with crispy samphire and truffle froth – photo below sent to me by staff at TFT.

tft-2

Monkfish served at The French Table (Click to enlarge)

Flowers feature often in the blog and I’m always trying to improve my close up photography in my garden and other gardens and wood lands. So here’s some examples (photos below) – snowdrops at Pitcox, tulips in my garden and the multi-coloured and delicate honeysuckle, also in my garden.

img_0110

Snowdrops at Pitcox

img_0331

Tulips in my garden

img_0406

Honeysuckle in my garden

Best picture I took this year? A hard one this as there’s such as variety of photos that I like – of favourite places like St Abbs Head or Dunbar harbour, but I’ve settled on one from my garden again, except the focus this time is not on the flower but on the bee. This is from a post entitled Summer flowers. Bees are not obedient. They move constantly and their wings beat even when they are attached to flowers. This one must have been enjoying the nectar so much that it momentarily stopped moving, allowing me to capture the bee’s complex physical structure, its vivid colours and its wing, which looks like a piece of ornate glassware you might find in an art gallery.

img_0666

Bumble bee on a hebe flower.

The best visit we did this year undoubtedly to the stunning Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao. From the moment you walk towards the outside of the building, you are in for a series of eyebrow raising moments and you lose count of the times you say “Wow!”. The external and internal structure of the museum represent a triumph of modern architecture, so impressive is the design and flow of the building. The two photos below can’t capture the wonder of this building but if it inspires you to visit, my efforts will have been worthwhile.

img_0793

Back of the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao

img_0817

Front of the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao

So that’s (part of) the old rung out and next week/year, I’ll ring in the new – more travel, more novels, more poetry, more photos – and anything else that comes in to the mind of this (at times) Bear of Little Brain – even if my favourite word is crepuscular.

 

 

 

San Sebastian: beach and museum, and Santander’s bronze figures

September 27, 2016

We spent three days in San Sebastian, the picturesque resort which is close to the French border on the Bay of Biscay. The internationally renowned San Sebastian Film Festival began while we were there – in the pouring rain. Fortunately, the previous two days were warm and sunny and we could walk along the semi-circular promenade next to the beach. This is similar to the Promenade Des Anglais in Nice and all day and well into the evening, people from a multitude of nations stroll along, looking at each other and wondering where everyone comes from. They also look at the wide sweep of beach where swimmers and surfers enjoy the breaking waves. On a sunny day, as in the photos below, the colours are contrasting – blue/turquoise sea and white waves; blue sky and white clouds.

img_0875

San Sebastian beach

img_0876

San Sebastian Beach

At  the end of the prom is a funicular railway which takes you to the top of Mount Igueldo from which you get spectacular views across the bay and far into the mountains.

img_0880

San Sebastian from Mount Igueldo

San Sebastian is famous for its food with a number of 3 star Michelin restaurants in the city such as the famous Arzak which offers a delicious tasting menu with a glass of champagne, although this will cost you about £150 per person. We thought we’d keep it for our next visit. We also went to the San Telmo Museum (good photos) which is near the sea front. This gave a fascinating insight into the history of the Basque people, in particular their agrarian background. While the first part of the museum is very modern, you walk through cloisters with beautiful ceilings (photo below) into an old church with its dramatic frescoes by Josep Maria Serp. One of the key features that you immediately see in San Sebastian (and to a lesser extent in Bilbao) is the prominent use of the Basque language. San Sebastian is the Spanish for Donostia, the Basque name for the town. All signs and menus are in Euskera, the Basque language, first and then in Spanish and then in French.

img_0897

San Telmo Museum cloister ceiling

Our last port of call was Santander where we only stayed one night but could have stayed longer. The town has a large ferry port and extensive promenade which leads to it sandy beaches (good photos). On the promenade, there are four bronze figures (good photos) of young boys, one of whom is diving into the water and it is fascinating to look at the figures from different angles.

img_0912

Los Racqueros in Santander

Like Bilbao and San Sebastian, the architecture in Santander is outstanding with many balcony strewn buildings which are kept in very good condition, as below. This was a new part of Spain for us but it comes highly recommended for many reasons.

img_0907

Santander architecture

The Creel Restaurant and Olhamstocks walk

April 18, 2016

We are lucky here in Dunbar (good photos) with a population of between 8ooo and 9ooo  to have a range of good local restaurants. While The Rocks has a fine reputation for excellent service and very good food, The Creel is the pick of the restaurants. The Creel is a small restaurant owned and run by award winning chef Logan Thorburn. We have visited The Creel many times with family and friends and have never had a bad meal. I contacted Logan who kindly answered my two questions and sent me the photos below. I firstly asked Logan ” What is your approach to cooking the meals you serve in the restaurant?”. His answer was “Great simple combinations using the very best of local produce that is available – season dependent – and all prepared in a true  modern-rustic artisan style”. The second question was “As a restaurant owner, what is your philosophy of service to your customers?”. The answer was ” We strive to offer relaxed, efficient and unobtrusive service that meets our customers needs and also matches our pricing bracket. We do try our very best although staffing a small restaurant in a small rural community can sometimes be a challenge”. If asked why I would recommend The Creel to locals and visitors alike, I would reply that the meals are of a  very high standard, cooked to order and with a depth of flavour often missing from other restaurants. For example, Logan’s fish and shellfish soup, served hot in a generous bowl with his own bread is as good as any bouillabaisse I’ve had in France. The two photos below show Logan’s extensive tapas dishes, including  Griddled Pork Loin with Green Peppers and Spanish Onions; Moroccan, Aubergine and Courgette Tagine,  Steamed Local Partan Crab Claws;  Classic Chic Pea Hummus; and Slow Rioja Braised Chorizo Sausage and Fennel Casserole. We haven’t tried this but it looks very enticing. The 2nd photos is  Steamed Clams with Garlic and Parsley Butter and served with Homemade Farmhouse Loaf. The Creel is a must visit restaurant if you are in the Dunbar area.

Logan 1

The Creel’s tapas dishes

Logan 4

The Creel’s clam dish

We stopped for a walk at the bonnie wee village of Oldhamstocks (good photos). This is a place with a long history. Olhamstocks (pr Old HAM stocks) is set in a valley between steep hills, one of which is a testing climb on the bike and the other is a steep, grassy slope where sheep graze. It is up the latter hill that runners strive when doing the annual hill run as part of the well-known Flower Show. There are many substantial stone buildings in the village and the one below had a grand display of daffodils on display.

IMG_0293

Impressive stone house in Oldhamstocks

We walked along to the local church where there is a very interesting historic graveyard.  The gravestone that caught my eye was that of Philip Orkney who died aged 86 – a very long time to live in the 19th century – in November 1875. Next to his name is the word feuer. When I looked this up, I had to search beyond the German word feuer meaning fire. In this context, a feuer is one who pays a feu or rent. So Mr Orkney had “a perpetual lease granted at full rent giving the feuer a continuing right of occupancy and the granter an ongoing rental”. This probably put him in a higher status than other people who paid rent but had no life-time guarantee of occupation. The graveyard is set in an idyllic spot with the countryside in full view.

IMG_0292

Gravestone in Oldhamstocks churchyard

Snowdrops at Pitcox and trip to Aberdeen

February 18, 2016

It’s February again, so my annual trip to Pitcox House to photograph the snowdrops and aconites. Pitcox is a hamlet about 4 miles from Dunbar and is on one my regular cycling routes. The big house (aka big hoose) is a feature of farms in Scotland and is the place were the (usually wealthy) farmer’s family would live. In contrast, the workers’ houses would be much smaller but this would depend on status. Across the road from the big hoose in Pitcox is the Grieve’s Cottage and opposite is the Gardener’s Cottage. The grieve was the farm manager or farmer’s right hand man and was the chief employee. The origin of this meaning of grieve has nothing to do with sorrow but is from the Old English graefa reeve. A reeve was an officer or King’s representative in a locality in medieval England, so graefa reeve was presumably a senior officer. If you know different, let me know.

IMG_0118

Pitcox House

The snowdrops are in profusion here. As I’ve noted before in this blog, lovers of snowdrops are called galanthopiles and, as the highlighted site shows, it is a very serious and often very expensive hobby. On the literature front, my favourite snowdrop poem is by Alice Oswald, and it’s simply called Snowdrop. The full poem can be found here – I hope this blogger asked for permission. Oswald sees the snowdrop as a sad girl and “One among several hundred clear-eyed ghosts/ who get up in the cold” but although the girl may be grieving (that word again!) she is “a mighty power of patience”.

IMG_0105

Snowdrops at Pitcox House

The other splash of colour – this time yellow – in the garden at Pitcox House comes from the aconites. These perennial plants are lovely to look at but most species are poisonous and shouldn’t be handled. They look like large buttercups and provide a nice contrast with the dazzling white of the snowdrops.

IMG_0112

Aconite at Pitcox House

At the weekend, we travelled north to the city of Aberdeen (good photos) for a wedding reception on Saturday but we made a weekend of it, driving up on Friday. We used to live in Aberdeenshire in the bonnie village of Kemnay and I taught at The Robert Gordon University in the 1980s. On Friday evening, we went to an old haunt, Poldino’s Italian restaurant in the city centre. We shared the Antipasto Vegeteriano – a very tasty ” selection of marinated and grilled vegetables, salad, olives, cheese and grissini”. I learned that grissini are breadsticks. I then had Panciotti Cappesante e Gamberi : “Scallop and prawn spherical pasta parcels through a fennel and smoked salmon sauce” which were light, with a delicate taste and an excellent sauce. My wife had Sogliola Certosina : “Fillets of lemon sole pan fried with, prawns, lemon, dill, cream and tomato”, which came as a very good sized sole fillet with a sauce that complimented, but did not overwhelm the fish. We finished by sharing a dessert – Montenero “First we drench sponge in Marsala then we add vanilla ice cream, over this we pour our own rich chocolate sauce” and this has not changed in 30 years with high quality ice cream and a delicious chocolate sauce. So, a nostalgic evening and a very enjoyable one. If you are in Aberdeen, this is a fine place to eat.

Poldino's restaurant in Aberdeen

Poldino’s restaurant in Aberdeen

On the Saturday, we were picked up by friends outside Marischal College. This magnificent building has recently been cleaned up and the granite was sparkling in the sun when we were there. When I looked up at the numerous spires, it reminded me of Gaudi’s Sagrada Familia, although Marischal College’s gothic design is more traditional. Outside the college is a statue of Robert the Bruce who was King of Scotland in the 14th century and the 5.6m high statue adds grandeur to the impressive college building behind.

Marischal College Aberdeen

Marischal College Aberdeen

 

Gothic spires of Marischal College

Gothic spires of Marischal College

Statue of Robert the Bruce at Marischal College Aberdeen

Statue of Robert the Bruce at Marischal College Aberdeen

After lunch, we went for a walk with our friends to the nearby Brig O’ Balgownie which in past times was the main entrance to the city. Further on, we visited the historic St Machar Cathedral, a 12th century building. The very helpful guide gave us a history of the church which was  a catholic cathedral until the Reformation in Scotland. It’s an unusual building because the walls are made of rough granite, which was gathered from the fields and this is different from usual cut granite or stone you see in other large churches. The pillars are cut granite and of a smoother appearance. Another distinctive feature is the flat, heraldic ceiling whereas you might expect a vaulted ceiling in such a building. The large organ dominates one side of the kirk where this is a different ceiling. This is another of these remarkable buildings which were erected with little available technology and often in hazardous conditions, and you have to admire the work of the stonemasons and labourers who built it.

Twin towers of St Machar Cathedral Aberdeen

Twin towers of St Machar Cathedral Aberdeen

 

Interior and heraldic ceiling in St Machar Cathedral

Interior and heraldic ceiling in St Machar Cathedral

 

The organ in St Machar Cathedral

The organ in St Machar Cathedral

The French Table and Kalamkari exhibition

January 20, 2016

One of the highlights of our recent trip to London was going to the delightful The French Table (aka TFT) restaurant in Surbiton. We were staying nearby with relatives in Thames Ditton and we were out celebrating our nephew Sid’s 21st birthday. The staff at TFT had added fine touches to our table, including red and white ribbons round the menu, as Sid supports Southampton FC. Also, at the top of the menu, they had written “Happy 21st Birthday Sid”. We were given a warm welcome by the cheery, helpful but not intrusive staff who were willing to answer questions about the menu – see below.

Scan_20160117

The French Table Menu

This was a menu – with the exception of the cauliflower – from which I could choose any of the dishes. To start with, my wife and I had the butternut squash crème brûlée. This was a new dish for us and it did not disappoint with the combination of the squash, the crunchy top, the flavoursome vegetables and tasty dressing. I’m going to try to make this and found a recipe (with video). Will it be as good as TFT? – unlikely but watch this space. I had the venison for main course and it was cooked to perfection – tender and pink in the middle, with a real depth of flavour. Two of the party had the monkfish which was praised for its flavour and superb accompaniments of crispy samphire and truffle froth. Zoe from TFT kindly sent me some photos of their dishes and the monkfish is shown below.

TFT 2

Monkfish at The French Table

We all shared a plate of delicious desserts and my favourite was the chocolate and peanut fondant with malt ice cream. Mmm – the malt ice cream was among the best I’ve had. There are two more photos below – the rabbit terrine and cherry soufflé.

TFT 1

Terrine of rabbit, ham hock, green olives and foie gras with homemade piccalilli and toasted walnut bread from The French Table

TFT 4

Morello cherry soufflé with pistachio ice-cream from The French Table.

So, if you ever anywhere near the Surbiton area –  and it’s not far from London – try out this restaurant, as it’s a real find. Next time we’re at our rellies (as the Australians say) we’ll be back.

From food to art and particularly fabrics. There’s a new exhibition at Waterston House in Aberlady and it features the work of the Dundee-based group Kalamkari. The group’s title derives, as the useful handout indicated, from ” a fabric painting and dyeing technique known as ‘kalamkari’ or ‘qualamkari’. There is something for everyone in this exhibition and the standard of textile art on show here is of a very high standard. The theme is nature and this is interpreted widely by the various textile artists on show here: Jan Reid, Carol Gorrie, Maureen Shepherd, Lorna Morrison, Lyn Gourlay, Mona Clark, Morag Gray, Mary Wallace and Sheila Paterson. There are flowers and birds here, but also shorelines,fantasy dolls and abstract pieces. We will certainly return for another viewing. Mona Clark kindly sent me photos two pieces I selected from the exhibition and the two on show here – Land of the Midnight Sun by Lorna Morrison and Rockface at Lunan Bay by Morag Gray – are indicative of the quality of the overall exhibition. If you can get to see the exhibition, please do, or look out for the work of the Kalamari group in the future.

Kal2

Land of the Midnight Sun by Lorna Morrison of the Kalamkari group

Kal 1

Rockface at Lunan Bay by Morag Gray of the Kalamari group

 

London trip: Victoria and Albert Museum and T S Eliot prize readings

January 13, 2016

This posting is rather late as we went down to London for the weekend last Thursday. We stayed in a hotel just around the corner from the London Eye, the huge Ferris wheel overlooking the River Thames. It’s an impressive piece of modern engineering but you do wonder what those who built Big Ben across the river might have thought if they could see into the future and look across to the Eye.  The photo below was taken on the manual focus setting as my camera has a problem – it will not take photos with the  automatic focus on.

IMG_0043

The London Eye on the Southbank

On Friday, we went to the Victoria and Albert Museum which is one of our favourite haunts when visiting London. It’s a vast complex of rooms with ” unrivalled collections of contemporary and historic art and design” and you can go from huge castings of Roman columns to miniature paintings and jewellery within a few minutes. We elected to go to the exhibition of the mid 19th century photography of Julia Margaret Cameron. There’s an excellent video on her on the Vimeo site by the curator of the exhibition. Cameron was a wealthy woman who took photographs of her family, her friends and acquaintances (some famous such as  Charles Darwin) and her servants, who posed for many photographs in which Cameron tried to combine art and photography. The photos below – reproduced under Creative Commons from the National Media Museum – show examples of Cameron’s remarkable work and, given that the photos are 150 years old, the clarity is remarkable.

Darwin

Charles Darwin by Julia Margaret Cameron

Cameron 1

Miss Philpott or May Hillier by Julia Margaret Cameron

We also went to see the Europe 1600-1815 exhibition and there were some beautiful rooms on display as well as some remarkably detailed pieces of furniture such as The Endymion Cabinet (very good silent video). Another outstanding feature was the Mirrored Room with its centrepiece a harp. You can see the room and listen to an audio description here. There are endless visits to the V&A and you’ll never live long enough to see them all, but what a wonderful place to go back to.

It was a busy weekend and coincided with my nephew Sid’s 21st birthday on Sunday. On Friday evening, we went to the excellent The French Table restaurant in Surbiton and this will be featured in the next posting. The original purpose of going to London was for me to go to The Royal Festival Hall for the T S Eliot Prize for Poetry readings, featuring many of the shortlisted poets. The evening was hosted by the distinguished poet and excellent presenter Ian McMillan who joked that his taxi driver had summed up an evening of poetry readings as “Another bloody do for people who wear cravats”. As McMillan said, although the Royal Festival Hall is a huge venue, when the individual poets were reading there was an intimate feeling in the hall. It was an inspiring evening as well as being entertaining, with McMillan’s introductions and anecdotes from Don Paterson. Below is the cover of the booklet given to the audience. The winner – announced the following day at the V&A – was Sarah Howe for her collection A Loop of Jade.

Scan_20160112

T S Eliot Prize for best collection of poetry 2015

 

 

Arthur Melville Exhibition, Mizen Head and autumal russet

November 5, 2015

At the National Galleries in Edinburgh at the moment, there is an excellent exhibition of the Scottish painter Arthur Melville.  There is a local interest for me as Melville was brought up in the village of East Linton (good photos)which is 6 miles (10K) from Dunbar. I went to a lecture on Melville’s paintings at the gallery and it was interesting to see many of the pictures displayed on the large screen. The lecture itself followed Melville’s life and especially his travels to Egypt and Spain but the presenter read the text and there was little individual comment on the paintings. The exhibition is entitled Arthur Melville: Adventures in colour and it is Melville’s dramatic use of colour, especially in depicting the sea and the sky, which catches the eye. The gallery notes refer to “his ability to evoke colour and light with the brilliance of stained glass” and this is an excellent description. For me, the highlights of the exhibition included his portrayal of a French peasant, the Arab Interior, Autumn – Loch Lomond and an early work, A Cabbage Garden which is shown below, as is the exhibition poster, both with permission of the National Gallery. There is such a wide range of paintings on show, in different styles and from different locations, that when you emerge from the exhibition, you feel that you have seen the work of several artists and not just Melville.

Arthur Melville exhibition

Arthur Melville exhibition

Arthur Melville A Cabbage Garden

Arthur Melville A Cabbage Garden

A part of the enjoyment of last week’s visit to Bamburgh, described in the previous post, was staying and eating in the Mizen Head hotel and restaurant. The rooms are spacious and comfortable and there is an excellent breakfast on offer. The restaurant has a justifiably high reputation for fine dining. The hotel is set on the edge of the countryside and there are superb views of rolling farmland from the restaurant. At this time of year, the winter wheat is emerging and, in the sunshine, the growing shoots are a beautiful green colour. We had dinner with our son and daughter in law, who had been a few times before, and we were very impressed. The restaurant is spacious, so no crowding of tables and the service was friendly and helpful, with little fuss. My first course was a generous helping of scallops in Thai butter and they were well cooked (i.e. not overcooked which some restaurants tend to do) and the Thai butter was delicate and brought out the flavours of the scallops. As an aside, I say scallops, pronouncing the A and not scollops, with the A pronounced as O. My wife had the very tasty Duo of Craster Kipper and Smoked Salmon pate. I then had halibut (again not over cooked) and my wife had the best fillet steak she’s ever had. The owners kindly allowed me to download 2 of the dishes and these are shown below, along with a photo of a collection of scallop shells on a barrel outside the hotel.

Seafood dish at the Mizen Head

Seafood dish at the Mizen Head

Steamed mussels at the Mizen Head

Steamed mussels at the Mizen Head

Scallop shells at the Mizen Head

Scallop shells at the Mizen Head

We were driving out of Dunbar the other day and my wife asked me how I would describe the autumnal colours of the trees which are shedding their leaves in the countryside. My reply was russet as this is a favourite word of mine. The OED defines russet as an adjective e.g. the russet bracken, a noun e.g. an apple with a brown skin or a coarse cloth which is reddish brown. So I thought that if this week’s word challenge was russet, which photos would I choose? Coincidentally, an email from my niece Ali included recently taken photos from the countryside in the south east of England. The first 2 photos are Ali’s and the next 2 are from my own photo archive.

Russet forest floor

Russet forest floor

Rurally russet

Rurally russet

Russet tree

Russet tree

Russet avenue

Russet avenue

 

La Garrigue and Bamburgh visit

October 28, 2015

A fine restaurant and a spectacular castle in this week’s blog. We recently had lunch at La Garrigue in Edinburgh. The website has a short and interesting video by the owner Jean Michel Gauffre. We went with old friends (my pal Tam and I went to school together aged 5) and of the four of us, only my wife had been before. We had an excellent lunch with well cooked and very tasty food, very attentive (but not intrusive) and friendly service, in this very attractive restaurant. I’m not a great lover of sardines but went for the sardine pâté. The pâté was moist and quite delicate and was served with sliced baked apple – a superb combination. My wife and friends all chose the fish of the day which was sea bass fillets, served with rice, mussels and a tasty sauce. I chose the guinea fowl which was cooked perfectly and had a jus with a real depth of flavour. We all had a dessert and Tam had a fine selection of cheese from Henri of Stockbridge. My chocolate mousse – a very generous portion – went down very well. The lunch menu offers 3 courses for £17 and this could be the best value quality lunch in Edinburgh. We will definitely be back. Jean Michel kindly allowed me to download these photos from the website.

La Garrigue restaurant, Edinburgh

La Garrigue restaurant, Edinburgh

Superb dish from La Garrigue, Edinburgh

Superb dish from La Garrigue, Edinburgh

At the weekend, we drove an hour from Dunbar into the north east England village of Bamburgh (pr Bam – burra) (good photos) to watch our son Jonathan run (and finish 7th in) the RunCastles Marathon. This is a tough race, physically because of the long climbs in part of the race, and mentally because of the long stretches of country road with high hedges. This must be a marathon with one of the most spectacular backdrops at the finish, with the huge and imposing Bamburgh Castle looking down imperiously on the finishers as in the photo below.

Our son at the finish of the marathon in Bamburgh

Our son at the finish of the marathon in Bamburgh

Bamburgh Castle’s history goes back to the 6th century with aspects of the castle including the huge walls and the Great Tower being built in the 12th century. It must have been amazing for peasants working in the fields in the 12th century to see this (to them) extraordinarily massive structure being built, as it was unlikely that they would have seen anything larger than their local church. Bamburgh Castle was built to show the power of the kings of England over many years, as well as to provide an impregnable fortress near the border with Scotland.

Bamburgh Castle

Bamburgh Castle

Behind the castle is the extensive Bamburgh Beach, a long, flat stretch of pristine beach and a superb walk in all seasons. We walked in the October sunshine with the white-topped waves easing their way to the shore. From the beach, you can see the Farne Islands (photo below) which is famous for its puffin colonies and, further in the distance, Lindisfarne. In the village itself, you can visit the Grace Darling Museum as well as St Aidan’s Church with its historic graveyard (photo below).

Farne Islands from Bamburgh Beach

Farne Islands from Bamburgh Beach

St Aidan's church Bamburgh

St Aidan’s church Bamburgh

Bamburgh has a range of pubs and tea rooms, gift shops, an excellent butcher and Clark’s standout vegetable store within the famous walled garden. It has an impressive range of fruit and vegetables, as in the photo below.

Clark's vegetables in Bamburgh

Clark’s vegetables in Bamburgh