Archive for the ‘hares’ Category

Keith Brockie exhibition and El Retiro Park in Madrid

October 6, 2017

The latest exhibition at Waterston House in Aberlady is by the renowned Scottish wildlife artist Keith Brockie. I featured Keith’s work on the blog  two years ago, having visited his last exhibition. The new show of paintings is equally stunning and there is a superb display of artistry here, particularly in the detailed portrayal of lapwings and hares. Keith kindly sent me 2 samples from this exhibition. The first painting features a lapwing  which is also called a Peewit, due to its call which you can listen to here (scroll down to audio). The painting perfectly captures the lapwing’s delicate colours and instantly recognisable tuft on its head. There are many superb paintings of lapwings in the exhibition and I particularly liked the ones with the lapwing sitting on its nest. The portrait of the ram is equally eye-catching and you have to admire the sheer tenacity of the painter to capture the detail of the hairs on the sheep’s face and what look like carvings on its magnificent horns. When the rutting season comes, I’m sure that this individual would emerge victorious.

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Lapwing and ram by Keith Brockie (Click to enlarge all photos)

The second painting is what I have entitled “Determined hare” as there is a steely look in the hare’s eyes. A close up of view of this and other hare portraits in the exhibition demonstrates Keith Brockie’s ability to capture the finest features of this beautiful animal. Look at the white whiskers, the oval nose and the small, puckered mouth and the brilliant contrast between the light and dark patches on the hare’s skin. The use of light and dark has challenged painters down the centuries and Keith Brockie makes superb use of this feature here. The exhibition is on until 15th November, so go and see it if you possibly can. We’ll be revisiting Waterston House before then.

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Determined hare by Keith Brockie

We recently spent a week in the Spanish capital Madrid (good photos) and what an impressive city it is. Madrid is a busy metropolis and the city centre is heavy with traffic for most of the day. However, just around the corner from the busy roundabout at the Palacio de Cibeles (video) is El Retiro Park (good photos), a vast green space which is easily accessible. The park has a 4k perimeter and is a favourite place for runners at all times of the day. It’s also a very peaceful place during the week when it is quieter. Most of the park consists of avenues of trees, bushes and hedges with walkways in between. Here we met a man playing a large harp.

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Harp player in El Retiro Park, Madrid

And we passed a puppet show where a group of children sat enthralled by the singing, storytelling and puppetry of a white haired, smiling puppet master.

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Puppet show in El Retiro Park, Madrid

Inside El Retiro Park are more formal gardens e.g. the Los Jardines de Cecilio Rodriguez (good photos). I made a short video on my mobile phone which you can download here. This is a very relaxing area, with its neatly trimmed hedges, little fountains, covered walkways and beautiful flowers, as in the photo below, taken on a lovely sunny day in Madrid with the temperature at a very pleasant 26 degrees. The topiary in the gardens is very impressive, with avenues of neatly shaped columns.

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Inside Los Jardines de Cecilio Rodriguez, Madrid

There are peacocks and peahens strolling around the gardens, ignoring the photographers and looking haughtily away from what I’m sure they regard as uncouth human onlookers. The peahen below is a good example. It could well have come straight out of a Keith Brockie exhibition, with its keen eye, exquisitely shaped feathers and a tuft that a lapwing would die for.

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Peahen in Los Jardines de Cecilio Rodriguez, Madrid

 

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Lucy Newton exhibition and walking up to Arthur’s seat

July 5, 2017

At Waterston House in Aberlady, the current exhibition (until 26 July) is by well known wildlife artist Lucy Newton. I reviewed Lucy’s last exhibition at SOC here almost exactly 2 years ago. If you had asked me in 2015 whether the then exhibition could be surpassed in quality, I would have doubted it, but along comes Lucy Newton in 2017 and produces an even more stunning exhibition than the last one. I again requested two images for the blog and Lucy kindly sent me four. The first one on view below is Brown Hare and I found the detail of the animal’s fur amazingly delicate, especially the whiskers around the mouth. You have a feeling from the hare’s eye that it is sensing something – danger perhaps and getting ready to run. The alert hare looks comfortable in her/his environment – sprigs of heather  and maybe snow? You can see how the hare might blend in nicely and use the heather as camouflage. I occasionally see hares while out cycling and the hare will often stop on the road, look at you from a distance, as if daring you to catch it. As soon as you get anywhere near it, the hare speeds down the road and disappears through a hedge. Even Chris Froome would not catch a hare.

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Brown Hare by Lucy Newton (Click to enlarge)

Choosing the 2nd photo of Lucy Newton’s work was difficult. There is a superb painting of a woodpecker on a moss laden tree, in which the moss and the bark flow down the trunk, and contrast with the vibrant colours of the bird. I chose the painting below of a barn owl in flight. You can see in the photo below that there is an energetic sense of movement about this piece of art. It is more stunning at the exhibition itself, as when you first see it, there is a fleeting feeling that the owl might really be in flight. In the background to the bird here, the series of abstract shapes also suggest movement to me and they reflect the swish of the bird’s wings, which are drawn with such detail that you see and feel action in the depiction of flight. This is an exhibition not to be missed if you are in the area.

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Barn Owl in Flight by Lucy Newton

My good friend an ex-colleague from Charles Sturt University Bob Pymm visited us recently from Australia. Unlike the rest of June in Dunbar, it was a gloriously sunny and warm weekend, with a flat calm sea. On the Monday, we got the train up to Edinburgh and walked up Arthur’s Seat (good photos). We walked from the Scottish Parliament along part of Holyrood Park (good photos in Gallery) and then up the direct route. It’s quite a climb up the rough steps and there are some parts where the scree is slippery. However, you get great views of the city as you climb higher. The first photo looks over to Fife, with eastern part of the city in view.

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View from half way up to Arthur’s Seat, Edinburgh

In the 2nd photo, Edinburgh Castle (good photos) is prominent on the right of the photo, with the spire of St Giles’ Cathedral half obscured by the Salisbury Crags. At the very top of Arthur’s Seat, there were crowds of visiting tourists, many of them young people, and we heard many languages going up and down the track. Edinburgh is now a very cosmopolitan city all the year round an there is great pleasure to be had in seeing so many people from different nations enjoying this outdoor environment.

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View across Edinburgh city centre from near the top of Arthur’s Seat

Going back to town, for lunch in the famous World’s End pub with its range of Belhaven beer, brewed here in Dunbar, we walked around the back of the Scottish Parliament, with its exquisite use of wood outside the offices of the MSPs. The photos below show firstly the wide view of the so-called “think pods” in the offices. In theory, these were designed to help the members as they contemplated developing policies to help the Scottish people. More cynical views see the pods as places where plots are hatched against the opposition.

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“Think pods” at the Scottish Parliament in Edinburgh

The second photos shows a closer view of the pods and their external wooden facades. The pods are elegantly designed and the wooden poles, set at angles to become an abstract feature, add to the aesthetic quality of the building’s exterior.

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“Think pods” and wooden facades at the Scottish Parliament in Edinburgh

 

 

Bondagers talk and book, Brockie exhibition and goldfinch

October 19, 2015

Last week, I went to a talk at our local history society on “The Bondagers – the system, their work and the dispute” given by Dinah Iredale who has conducted impressive research  and written an illustrated book on this topic. A bondager was a woman farmworker , mainly in the early to mid 19th century but also later, and this research covers Northumberland and south east Scotland. What was peculiar about bondager women was that they were hired as part of a deal between the farmer and the hind – a married ploughman. The bondage system could be onerous for the hind who had to provide a bondager to work during the harvest and for occasional labour, as he would not get the job otherwise. For some hinds, their wives or other female relatives could do the work but for young hinds with families, it meant employing someone outside the family. For the bondagers themselves, this was also an onerous system as they were at the beck and call of the farmer, via the hind, and also had to live with the hind’s family in often very cramped conditions. An interesting local dimension for me is that in and around Dunbar, the term “hind” was used more generally for someone from the countryside. There was a rather derogatory reference to a man from the country, as he was described as “A hind fae (from) the country. Come doon (down) fae the hills and canny soom (can’t swim). Dinah has kindly given me permission to download the book cover and a photograph from her excellent book.

Bondagers by Dinah Iredale - book cover

Bondagers by Dinah Iredale – book cover

Bondagers and hinds in a farm yard

Bondagers and hinds in a farm yard

The latest exhibition at Waterston House in Aberlady is by the well-known wildlife artist Keith Brockie. Keith Brockie has a local connection, being born in Haddington which is 11 miles (18K) from Dunbar. I bought his book Return to One Man’s Island (includes many examples of Keith’s work) a few years ago, so I was intrigued to see in what directions his work had progressed. We went to the exhibition expecting to see more excellent painting of birds but in this exhibition, there are several superb paintings by Keith of hares, seals and a range of birds. I emailed Keith and he generously sent me photos of some of his paintings for this blog. The first is entitled Brown Hare at Rest and you can see the amazing detail of the animal’s fur, as well as the grass which is green in colour but also looks like hair. The brown hare’s eye has a peaceful look and the body is relaxed, perhaps enjoying a sunny afternoon.

Brown Hare at Rest by Keith Brockie

Brown Hare at Rest by Keith Brockie

The second painting is also of a hare but this time, it is a white mountain hare with a background of heather and snow. As in the first photo, the detail is outstanding in its delineation of the hare’s whiskers and fur, as well as the heather. This hare looks well fed and well content in the winter sunshine.

Mountain Hare in Sunlight by Keith Brockie

Mountain Hare in Sunlight by Keith Brockie

The third painting has a very close connection for me, as it shows a kittiwake adult and chick on the walls of Dunbar Castle (good photos). The kittiwakes are very well drawn and the adult’s yellow beak stands out. For me, it is the painting of the rocks behind the birds which make this picture as it shows the effects of the weather on the rock (and of course the effect of the kittiwakes’ droppings!). As regular readers will know, I’ve tried to photograph the kittiwakes over many years, using my zoom lens. One of my photos is included below but it is certainly not meant to be anywhere near the standard of Brockie’s painting.

Kittiwakes at Dunbar by Keith Brockie

Kittiwakes at Dunbar by Keith Brockie

Kittiwakes on Dunbar Castle walls

Kittiwakes on Dunbar Castle walls

A new edition of Scottish Birds arrived in the post recently and I was very attracted to a superb photo of a goldfinch (includes short video). I contacted Harry Scott, who took the photo and he kindly sent me the photo shown below. This bird has outstanding colours and I love the variety of the colour shapes  – the eye, the beak, the bands of red/orange, white, black, yellow and blue, all of which have an abstract quality. The goldfinch recently came to prominence in literature with Donna Tart’s extraordinary book. The title comes from a famous painting by Carel Fabritius and in the story, the boy protagonist walks off with the painting after an explosion at a museum.

Goldfinch by Harry Scott

Goldfinch by Harry Scott