Archive for the ‘Travel’ Category

The Illegal Age by Ellen Hinsey and Karangahake Gorge Walk

December 17, 2018

There are very few books of poetry that make you feel uncomfortable while reading them. You admire the versatility of the poet, the striking imagery and the immaculate construction of the book, but the content is disturbing. Ellen Hinsey‘s The Illegal Age (review) is one of the these books. The subject of the book is totalitarianism across the world and what she refers to as “political illegality” as seen, many would argue, in regimes such as that in Turkey today. So this is not poetry for the faint-hearted and it may be seen as very different from lyrical poetry dealing with nature for example. On the other hand, it is not so different, in that the poet is using imagery to allow us to examine the subject of the poems. The book is highly structured, with 3 sections, each with 7 sub-sections and the reviewer above suggest that the poet may be trying to replicate the bureaucratic structures of oppressive regimes – something I had not thought about.

The first section beings “Nothing happens quickly; each day weighs on the next -/ Until the instant comes -” when someone walking “along/ The foggy lane in innocence”  disappears. This suggests the gradualism of oppression. Another section deals with The Inconceivable which again creeps up on society until it is too late. This reminded me of Germany in the 1920s and 1930s when most people would have seen the consequent rise of Nazism as inconceivable at the time. Hinsey then writes “.. the Inconceivable seeps forward, mastering territory with the unpredictable sleight of a storm’s stealth” – a frightening but beautiful image. In The Denunciation, subtitled East Germany 1979, a woman reflects on her husband/lover’s betrayal, asking when it began e.g. “when you sat together by the braille of a restless lake” or when he kissed her “by the prying iridescent eye of the butterfly”. Both these images – of the lake and the butterfly – are very imaginative and in another context would be uplifting and Hinsey does this throughout the book, to great effect. 

This will not be the most comfortable read of you life, but it does stress how important it is to record the rise of oppression and to remember it. Hinsey’s imagery will stay with you for a long time. 

Ellen Hinsey’s powerful book of poems (Click on all captions to enlarge the images)

On our trip to New Zealand, our niece took us to Karangahake Gorge (good photos) which is the site of an old gold mine. There are a number of different walks and we chose one of the longer ones which took us to the top of the hill which housed the mine. There are many interesting boards along the way and the one at the start of the walk (below) gives you an insight into what you might be encountering along the way. 

Karangahake Gorge in New Zealand’s North Island

It was in the late 19th and early 20th centuries that gold mining was undertaken by large British companies at Karangahake and there is a good history here. As you go up the mount, you come across the remains of the mining infrastructure and equipment. Working in these gold mines was a hazardous occupation, as cyanide was widely used to extract the gold. The information board below shows some of the machinery used to crush the stone and then to mix the ore with cyanide. The ore/cyanide mix was made into bullion and on the bottom right, you can see a photo of a man pouring the molten liquid into a barrow. Health and safety regulations were unheard of in those days and other boards told of the fatalities that occurred in the mines. 

The use of cyanide in gold mining at Karangahake Gorge

As you climb to the top of the Mount Karangahake you pass many of the railway lines used to transport the stone down to the processing plant near the river. You also go through dark tunnels (phone torches needed) and you get the feeling of how claustrophobic it must have been in many parts of the mine. The walk is steep in parts and tricky in others but it is worth climbing to near the summit to get the views down to the river, as in the photo below. 

View from one of the lookouts down to the river at the Karangahake Gorge

One of the most fascinating features of this walk was the variety of ferns which we encountered along the way. The ferns themselves were of a multiplicity of greens and very attractive in themselves. What was more striking were the fronds which emerged from the ferns. The photo below shows the fronds emerging from a silver fern  and the stem is called a koru. 

Silver fern with fronds emerging from the korus

A close-up view (below) shows the delicacy of the frond which looks as if it could have been knitted or woven and the design might be used as the figurehead of a walking stick. With its delicate hairs on display, it also resembles what might be a curled up millipede, waiting to strike the next unassuming insect. This is nature as sculpture and a strikingly beautiful example of it. 

Silver fern frond in Karangahake Gorge

The Karangahake Gorge/Mount walk is an exhilarating one from start to finish and I highly recommend it to anyone visiting the area. Near the end of the walk, I took this video at the side of the river.

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Benjamin Black’s Holy Orders and Mount Maunganui

December 10, 2018

Holy Orders by Benjamin Black  (good video) is the 6th book in the 1950s Dublin-based series featuring the clever but self-doubting pathologist Quirke, his daughter Phoebe and his detective ally Hackett. Like the other Quirke novels, this may be classified as a crime novel, but this is a very well written novel, with a superb sense of place, an engaging plot and excellent characterisation, which has a crime as its centre. Benjamin Black is the pen name of Booker prize-winning author John Banville and this shows in some of the lyrical phrases which Black uses in the book to very good effect. You don’t read Benjamin Black for a page-turning potboiler, but you do read him for a story which will intrigue you as to which way it will turn. You also read him for his engaging characters, particularly Quirke who is often troubled by thoughts of his school days when he was abused by Catholic priests. In this novel, Black also fleshes out the character of his daughter Phoebe, whose journalist friend Jimmy Minor has been beaten to death and dumped in the Dublin canal. Quirke and Hackett set out to identify the killer(s) and there is a gradual build up to a satisfactory conclusion for the reader – no spoilers here. 

Black – like Banville – has some outstanding phrases in the book which stand out in the memory e.g. “In the fireplace, a dolmen of turf logs was smouldering sullenly”. A dolmen? The Cambridge Dictionary defines it as ” a group of stones consisting of one large flat stone supported by several vertical ones, built in ancient times “. Once you know the meaning, Black’s imagery is even more powerful. In describing Sally, Jimmy Minor’s sister, Black writes “Her hair shone like coils of dark copper”. Another powerful simile – “In Baggot Street, the trees shivered and shook like racehorses waiting for the off”. This is an impactful book in many ways and as the plot develops, more social issues in Ireland emerge and become part of the story. If you like well-written, well-plotted and sometimes drolly humorous novel, then this is definitely for you and it would make a great festive season gift. 

The 6th book in the Quirke series (Click on all captions  to enlarge photos)

On our trip to New Zealand, we visited my sister and brother-in-law in Tauranga (good photos).  Tauranga has a huge harbour with extensive docks which regularly house cruise liners and large container ships, such as the one below, heading for the harbour.

Container ship heading towards Tauranga harbour.

Mount Maunganui  lies on the other side of the harbour and is described as a “holiday paradise”. It has a beautiful stretch of beach and on a sunny summer’s day, with the white waves easing themselves ashore from a deep blue sea, you can see why. Here is the beach with the Mount at the end. 

Mount Maunganui beach and The Mount.

Originally a separate village from Tauranga, “The Mount” as local refer to it, is called after Mauoa which is the remaining top of an extinct volcano. You can walk up and over the Mount or around it and the 360 degree views are spectacular from the top, from where you can see the harbour,  Motuotau (Rabbit Island) (good photos), out to the ocean and along the beach. Below is a photo taken from the top of The Mount and looking over Mount Maunganui and the beach. It is quite a strenuous walk to the top of The Mount but we did it in 30 min as we are pretty fit. The track is quite rough in parts and there are some very steep inclines. So it is a good workout as well a rewarding walk, given the views from the top. 

View over Mount Maunganui beach 

There is also an excellent walking track around the base of The Mount. It is a much easier walk but it gives you time to appreciate the surroundings more – the trees, the sheep and the vegetation. I mentioned the many tankers going into Tauranga Harbour as well as the cruise liners. On our last visit in 2011, we were walking around The Mount when we were passed by this huge liner. You can see the size of the vessel by looking at the people on the track. We had seen this same cruise liner docked at Circular Bay in Sydney just a few days earlier. 

Cruise liner heading for Tauranga Harbour

Daintree Rainforest and snorkelling on the Low Isles (Version 2)

December 4, 2018

On our trip to Australia, we had two things that we wanted to do that we hadn’t done before. The first was to visit the Daintree rainforest (good photos) in Northern Queensland. The rainforest is the oldest in the world – 180 million years – much older than the Amazon equivalent. It is a vast forest covering 12,000 square kilometres and our Daintree river trip host told us that it has 1034 native trees. To put this in perspective, he told us that the UK has 37 and the USA 300+. On the river trip, you look up to the huge swathes of trees but you cannot really distinguish different species of tree and fern until you walk into the forest itself. A short way up the river, we came upon a female crocodile (photo below) on the river bank. Crocodiles are perhaps fascinating to some and while it was good to see one in its natural habitat, they are not the word’s most attractive creatures, although the patterns on their hide are elegant.  

Crocodile on the Daintree river (Click on all photos or caption to open in a new tab)

It is when you go into the rainforest itself that you appreciate the variety of trees and ferns on display. The boat host advised us ” in the forest itself, don’t look AT the trees, look THROUGH THEM” and this was very good advice. In the photo below (from Creative Commons) you can see some of the variety of the trees and the ubiquitous ferns which are very attractive. It is fascinating to look at even this relatively small space and note how many different trees there are and how they are differently shaped. 

Inside the Daintree rainforest

In the next photo (my own) you can see the vibrant colours of this large leafed fern. We had just missed a rainshower and the leaves were sparkling in the afternoon light. Behind this fern , you can see a variety of smaller ferns and you can read much more about the Daintree ferns, which first appeared 325 million years ago on this helpful site. It would have been wonderful to go on an extended walk with a guide in the rainforest but time was limited. One for a future visit. 

Beautiful ferns in the Daintree Rainforest

The other reason for choosing Port Douglas as the first destination on our trip was to visit the Great Barrier Reef (great video). The reef is under threat from climate change and there have been dire warnings that, with further warming of the seas, it could disappear in 10-20 years. We went on a boat trip to the Low Isles, a half hour of huge waves and some extreme ups and downs. When you get to the island, it looks idyllic – see photo below – with its pristine sandy beach, lighthouse and trees. 

Low Isles sea, beach and lighthouse

Once on the island, we were given thin suits to protect us from jellyfish, which are called stingers in this part of the world. Confusingly for British people living in Australia, jellyfish are also called bluebottles. We were then taught how to use the snorkelling masks and flippers. It was our first experience of snorkelling and what we saw under the water made it a worthwhile trip. Once we were directed to a buoy not far off shore, we saw the range of coral on the ocean floor and a huge variety of fish, including parrot fish (good photo) and angel fish (good video). We also saw some fairly large turtles in the water nearby.

After the snorkelling, we were taken on a short tour of the island and we saw numerous terns which were nesting. Unlike the local arctic terns which nest near Dunbar in a protected area and which will dive approaching humans, these common terns (photo below) went about their business quietly. Close up, this is a most attractive bird and the background of spiky tree trunks and leaves show off its sharp colours and distinctive black/blue line across its eyes.  

Tern on the Low Isles near Port Douglas

On the island, there is an impressive lighthouse which was built in 1878. Our guide asked us to look up towards the light and we did, we could see two osprey chicks (photo below) sitting at the edge of the nest. I was hoping that the birds might look down to improve the photo but they remained still, while haughtily ignoring our presence far below. The birds looked smaller than they are, especially sitting next to the huge ramshackle nest. 

Osprey chicks on the Low Isles lighthouse

This was a very satisfying day for us – a new adventure on an idyllic island surrounded by the warm ocean, on which the sun glinted and the water sparkled. 

Visit to Peebles and Dawyck Gardens

November 5, 2018

It’s 3 years since Peebles featured on the blog here and 4 years since I highlighted signs in Peebles here. This was a coldish but sun-filled day and the autumnal colours were having their annual beauty contest in the trees by the river and on the river paths. This is the view from the main road bridge in Peebles, looking along the river Tweed.

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Looking down the river Tweed from the Tweed Bridge in Peebles (Click on all photos to enlarge)

The next photo is taken from the other side of this bridge and looks over the town centre towards the hills in the distance. The Leckie Memorial Church spire is prominent and there is a range of colours in the trees.

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Looking over the park and town towards the hills in Peebles

What we did not know at this point, was that the colours seen from the bridge paled into insignificance compared to what we were about to experience. Our main purpose for the day was to visit Dawyck Gardens which is an offshoot of the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh (good photos). The name “gardens” is rather a misnomer for the Dawyck experience as it consists mainly of woodland, but this is extremely well nurtured woodland, with labels helping you to identify the many variety of trees. The site changes with the seasons, with swathes of snowdrops and daffodils in spring,  and beautiful azaleas in summer. We were treated to the autumn spectacle. Having paid to enter at the well-stocked shop, you can follow a variety of paths through the woods. In addition to the splendour of the scenery, this is good exercise as you walk to the top of the gardens and through the different areas. We were alerted to the domed acer (photo below) near the start of the walk and a stunning sight it is. The acer or Japanese maple is relatively common in the UK but we had never seen one as eye-catching as this sudden splash of deep pink in the midst of evergreens. It is also a very shapely tree.

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Domed acer in Dawyck Gardens

There is also a magnificent range of impressive Douglas Fir trees, named after the Scottish botanist David Douglas, and many of the trees here were grown from seed, whose descendants were brought to Scotland by David Douglas. The one shown below is an excellent specimen and it is only when stand underneath one of these trees that you get to appreciate their height, solidity and what looks like bubbling growth. These trees dominate their surrounds and while the other trees may appear smaller, you appear very small indeed.

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Douglas Fir at Dawyck Gardens near Peebles

There are a number of benches in the woods and taking a seat in one of the benches at the top of the forest, you are rewarded with stunning views. The photo below shows one such view, looking at a wide variety of trees and the hills above Peebles in the background. As your eye wanders across the scene, you go from the multi-coloured and multi-patterned deciduous trees to the larger and smaller fir trees, with the smaller ones making elegant green triangles on the leafy ground. You can sit for quite a while here and always catch something different as you survey this aesthetically pleasing landscape.

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Dawyck Gardens looking over the hills near Peebles

There is a huge variety of trees here and some are quite unusual, such as the sorbus munda belowWhat was fascinating about this tree was that, as you approached it, you feared for its survival because it was covered in lichen. However, another visitor with good knowledge of trees told us that the lichen was a sign of a very healthy sorbus munda, despite the fact that the lichen was making the attractive berries quite hard to see.

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Sorbus munda at Dawyck Gardens near Peebles

In contrast, the sorbus commixta, a similar tree of Chinese origin, had little lichen and a beautiful display of berries as shown below.

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Sorbus commixta at Dawyck Gardens near Peebles

I took many more photos of the trees, the paths and the carpets of leaves – too many to show here. I leave you with a video of part of this wonderful forest, to which we shall return in the spring. We are off to Australia and New Zealand for 3 weeks in a few days time, so blog posts may be more intermittent than usual.

 

Seville: Archivos des Indias and Esplanada d’Espana

October 30, 2018

In the centre of Seville, just along from the cathedral is the Archivos des Indias or General Archive of the Indies. The huge archival collection, which covers 300 years of Spanish colonisation in the Americas, is housed in a strikingly attractive building (see below) which has superbly crafted ironwork on it many balconies and eye-catching tiles around its upper sections.

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Archivos des Indias, Seville (Click on all photos to enlarge)

While many scholars visit the archives for research, most people go to see the interesting interior of the building. In the building’s many rooms, there are displays of examples of the archival material held there, such as Columbus’ letters to his son or a catalogue of fabric samples. What is most remarkable is the design of the interior with its delicately crafted wood and sculpted ceilings, which are worth taking time to look at closely. As you see in the photo below, there is a variety of symbols carved into the wood and these may represent the trades of the merchants who first used the building to carry out their trading.

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Carved wooden surrounds in the Archivos des Indias, Seville

As you walk down the marble stairs, there is an impressive array of carvings around the sign for the archives. In the photo below, above the name, there is a crown and carved crests and on either side of the sign, and there are beautiful marble pillars and star-shaped carvings. This symmetrical design – at once simple and complex – makes you stop on the staircase and look at the carvings. This is clearly the work of expert craftsmen.

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Part of the staircase in the Archivo des Indias, Seville

I took a wee video of the inside of the main room in the archive – see below. There was also a 15 minute video – in English and Spanish – which tells the history of the building. What is intriguing about this video is that the narrator is the building itself, telling how “I” began as a merchants’ building , fell into ruin and eventually became the archive we visit today.

On the trip to Seville, we made the fatal mistake of not booking online for fabulous Alcazar Gardens and were faced by a huge queue in 30 degrees of sunshine, so we moved on. We were rewarded not far away with the spectacular Esplanada de Espana (good photos), a magnificent crescent of connected buildings, with 2 huge towers at either end. This splendid edifice was built in 1929 but it looks much older. The photo below shows one of the towers which rises above the canal, which goes round part of the square. Looking at the towers, it makes you think that this might be a tribute to traditional Spanish architecture and design, with the layers to towers rising to a peak, suggesting a Moorish influence at the top.

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One of the towers bookending the Esplanada de Espana, Seville

An outstanding feature of the area is the ceramics, starting with the array of pillars which go around the perimeter of the entrance and around the canal. As you see in the photo below, there are ceramic figures on the pillar and tiles at the top and bottom of the ceramic pillars. The tiles are known as azulejos and have been made since the Romans were in Spain. The coloured tiles are thought to have been introduced by the Moors and there are definite signs of Moorish/Islamic influence in  all parts of this building.

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A pillar/lamppost at the entrance to the Esplanada de Espana, Seville

On the walkway above the canal, there are large areas of mosaic tiling and at regular intervals, there are large tiles depicting all the different regions of Spain. The example below celebrates the province of Huelva, which lies to the west of Seville and stretches to the Portuguese border. The colours in each of the squares are vibrant and it is interesting to see the different coat of arms for each region. The Esposicion Ibero Americana noted in the tiling was a world fair in 1929 to enhance trade particularly between Spain and South America.

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Coat of Arms of Huelva province in the Esplanada de Espana, Seville

There is so much to see in the Esplanada that you can easily spend an hour or more looking at the building from different perspectives e.g. there are balconies on to which you can climb to look down on the square and the canal and across to the two towers. You must not miss this out in a visit to Seville.

I took a video of the Esplanada de Espana and I hope that this gives you a flavour of the uniqueness of this very joyful building and square.

The late poet Matthew Sweeney and Seville Cathedral

October 23, 2018

A delayed blog due to your blogger’s significant birthday celebrations. I was shocked to read an obituary in the Guardian about the death of the poet Matthew Sweeney, who was only 65 years old. He died of motor neurone disease, a terribly debilitating illness of which one of my school friends died. I looked in my collection of Poetry Book Society choices on my bookshelves and found Sweeney’s 1989 collection Blue Shoes. Sweeney was an imaginative and often humorous poet . The Lighthouse Keeper’s Son from Blue Shoes, reads after the title “got arrested/ as he wobbled home on a lightless bicycle, after a late drink/ and he asked the cop/ if the pockmarked moon/ wasn’t light enough/ not to mention the Plough’s/ seven stars/ and his dad’s beam/ lighting the road/ twice a minute/ then searching the sea/ the umpteenth time/ for nothing”. While this is a humorous poem, maybe set in the Irish countryside, about a drunk man, a bike and a policeman, it is also one that contains intriguing imagery. The moon is “pockmarked” and the lighthouse “searches” the sea for “nothing”. The last word is ambiguous – does it mean that the light normally does not reveal anything in the sea, or is the light doing it for free? It is of course, not the light that searches but maybe the keeper. You can hear Sweeney reading his poems here and they are certainly worth listening to.

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Matthew Sweeney’s 1989 collection of poems (Click on all photos to enlarge)

On a recent trip to trip to the beautiful city of Seville with my pal, the main impetus of the visit was to see the football (aka soccer) match between Sevilla and Celta Vigo on a warm October evening. Those not interested should skip the next bit and go to the next paragraph. Here is the inside of the stadium just before kick-off.

We were there of course to also enjoy the city and its magnificent architecture, excellent restaurants and its culture. To say that Seville Cathedral is massive is a gross understatement. Some of its chapels are the size of cathedrals in other parts of the world. It was built on the site of a 12th century mosque and it took over 100 years to build, so both religions wanted something impressive to represent their faith. The outside of the cathedral is so extensive that you cannot photograph it all at once. The first photo shows the magnificent bell tower and the 2nd photo shows the exquisitely ornate main entrance to the cathedral.

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Seville Cathedral’s bell tower

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Entrance to Seville Cathedral

Inside the cathedral, the high vaulted ceilings and the perfect stonework of the pillars lead you into different areas and altars, such as the beautifully crafted and imposing silver altar. This video which I took in the main part of the cathedral, gives you an idea of the cathedral’s grandeur, including the superb sculpture of the tomb of Christopher Columbus, although there is some doubt as to whether it is Columbus or his brother that is in the sepulchre.

The cathedral is always busy with tourists, religious people and humanists, and each person will take their own view of this utterly stunning building and its variety of interior decoration, which displays an amazing range of craft skills and artistry. It is certainly a must visit to this enchanting city.

Peter Carey’s A Long Way From Home and the National Gallery of Ireland

October 11, 2018

I have just finished Peter Carey’s remarkable novel A Long Way From Home which features two very distinct voices of the main characters in the book. Peter Carey is one of Australia’s best known novelists and has won the Man Booker Prize twice, once with his truly original novel The True History of the Kelly Gang, which featured the remarkable voice of the semi-literate Kelly. In the current book, there are two distinct voices which dominate the book in alternate chapters. The first voice is of the feisty and diminutive (in height only) Irene Bobs who gets married to her car salesman husband Titch. Irene is determined to succeed and has refined humorous descriptions of events and people down to a fine art, for example in her dealings with her rascally father in law Dan. The second voice is of Willie Bachhuber, a very intelligent and thoughtful teacher, who is accident prone in life and love. He is dismissed for hanging a pupil, the son of a local villain, upside down outside a classroom window. He moves next door to the Bobs family and ends up being a navigator for their car in the famous Australian Redex Trial, a hair-raising race around Australia in the 1950s. You can get a flavour of the race in the video below.

This is the adventure story part of the book but the novel is much more than a rip-roaring tale. The family tensions within the Bobs family deal with love and emotion. The other major part of the novel deals with Australia’s history of ill-treatment (and earlier genocide) of the aboriginal peoples who once owned all the land. The story of Willie Bachhuber and his family background is often moving but never sentimental, and his teaching of aboriginal children – and learning from them – is inspirational. Carey carefully intertwines the stories of his characters, both white people and aboriginal “blackfellahs”, a term used by both races. This compulsive novel is by turns hilarious and heart-wrenching and contains Carey’s often poetic but always immaculately structured sentences. Some examples: “Mrs Bobs piloted with her nose just above the wheel, checking her mirrors left, right and centre. I was reminded of a sparrow eating”. “Clover was about my own age, tall and slender as a flooded gum”. “Doctor Battery [an aboriginal man] sang softly, with sufficient authority, it seemed, to lift the sun up from the sand, suck the shadows out across the plain”. Go out and buy this novel and the voices of the two main characters will remain with you for a long time.

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Peter Carey’s enthralling new novel (Click on all photos to enlarge)

The final experience of our trip to Dublin was a visit to the impressive National Gallery of Ireland which has an excellent range of Irish artists, as  well as works of the more famous such as Monet, Vermeer and Turner (click on links for examples of their work). My main aim was to learn more – and see examples of – Irish painting and portraiture, and I was not disappointed. The first painting which really caught my eye is The Sunshade by William Leech. The colours in the painting range from vivid to subtle and the sunlight on the woman’s top contrasts with the shadows created by the umbrella. The woman’s top veers from green at the top to bright yellow at the bottom. There is delicacy everywhere in this most attractive painting – in the fine lines of the umbrella, in the woman’s elegant neck and in her fine hands. What is she thinking as she stares into space and her fingers touch on the umbrella’s handle? I think that the artist would leave that for us as individuals to interpret.

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The Sunshade by William Leech

The second work of art is Carting Seaweed on Sutton Sands by Joseph Malachy Kavanagh. The information beside painting – done in 1895 – tells us that collecting seaweed on beaches near Dublin “for food, medicine and fertiliser” was a common practice, as it was elsewhere in Europe. There is so much to admire in this painting – the doleful horses waiting patiently to haul the ever-heightening load of seaweed; the ominous dark clouds, which may be moving away from their lighter and fluffier counterparts – or approaching them; the wet sand with puddles reflecting the wheels and the horses’ feet; the waves which make little impact on the shore; and the man who is busy collecting the seaweed in his rough clothes, with a tear in his waistcoat at the back. Part of the scene echoes Philip Larkin’s lines in To the Sea – “the small, hushed waves’ repeated fresh collapse”. As I live by the sea, paintings of beaches always intrigue me and this painting was no exception.

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Carting Seaweed on Sutton Sands by Joseph M Kavanagh

The final painting is by Sir John Lavery (many examples) some of whose works I have seen in the National Gallery of Scotland (example)The one I have chosen from Dublin is Return from Market, painted in France, as was the Leech example above. This impressionist work shows a mother and daughter returning from the market in a small rowing boat, although the girl is using the oar like a punt. This is quite a large painting, so you can stand back and admire the gentle reflections of the woods and the boat on the water. The leaves at the top and the beautiful water lilies at the bottom of the painting give the work a calming and perhaps dream-like quality. It is a rustic and timeless scene. I like the way the artist captures the serenity of the water lilies, just as they are about to be swept aside by the boat.

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Return from Market by John Lavery

The National Gallery of Ireland is in an impressive, modern building. The lay-out can be confusing but the staff were friendly, helpful and informative. It was a pleasure to visit.

A Day in Dun Laoghaire and it’s the Time of the Season for … gladioli

October 4, 2018

On our trip to Dublin, we went by train to the bonnie seaside town of Dun Laoghaire (good photos). It was only 20 minutes on The Dart train and it is a very pleasant trip down the coast to Dun Laoghaire (pronounded Dun Leery), passing the famous Lansdsdowne Road rugby and football stadium, and the seaside towns of Blackrock and Salthill and Monkstown.  Having arrived in Dun Laoghaire, we headed straight for the east pier which is 1.3K long and takes you out to the lighthouse. It’s a very enjoyable walk, with (photo below) the little yachts swaying gently in the swell as you make your way to the end. This is one of the town’s exercise spots as we passed, and were passed by, runners and speed walkers. There are also excellent views back to the town and out to sea when you reach the lighthouse, which still has some of the original military accommodation, such as the guard house on view.

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Dun Laoghaire East Pier and Lighthouse (Click on all photos to enlarge)

From the harbourside on the east pier, you look across to the west pier, which is almost as long. Looking back into town, one of the striking features is the relatively recent library building (photo below). As well as the library, there is a theatre, art gallery and cafe. The building is somewhat confusing for the first time visitor as it has several levels and different entrances/exits. Despite this it is a fine library, with much natural light and open spaces for study or relaxation. It is also an excellent addition to the architecture of the town, with the funnel like shapes on the top and the elegant use of glass at the end facing the sea.

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Library building from the harbourside in Dun Laoghaire.

While in the town, we visited the National Maritime Museum which is housed in an old church and this adds to its attractiveness. One of the museum’s most spectacular objects is the Baily Optic which is a huge light taken from the lighthouse in the seaside town of Howth. In the photo below, you can see how the light dominates that part of the museum, and how the natural light from the old church’s stained glass windows compliment the lighthouse optic.

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Baily Optic in the National Maritime Museum in Dun Laoghaire

Looking across the museum (photo below), you can see a variety of collections which the building houses, including the Great Eastern ship, a section on submarines and a small section on The Titanic. We learned much about ships over the centuries as well as aspects of navigation, and also the social aspects of travel by sea.

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Collections in the National Maritime Museum in Dun Laoghaire.

Dun Laoghaire is a busy town with a range of cafes, pubs and restaurants and there are a number of enjoyable walks in the town itself as well as by the sea.

People of a certain age reading the heading of this blog post will immediately recall the wonderful Zombies’ track Time of the Season on their iconic LP Odessey and Oracle (note the deliberate misspelling of Odyssey). Here it is for you to luxuriate in.

In my garden, just as most of the summer flowers are beginning to show signs of exhaustion, having bloomed vigorously for 3 months, the gladioli now come into their own and stand imperiously above the rest. My gladioli are the Burj Khalifa  of the flowers, towering over the others and they have been particularly tall and colourful this year. The first photo shows a purple example, the delicate folds of the flower protecting the scorpion-like stigma, the pollen holder. I also like the shadows on the sun-touched petals and the emerging flowers above.

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Purple gladiolus at the back of our house

The next photo is of a more showy gladiolus, vigorously projecting its multiple shades on to the viewer. This flower could be a filmstrip of the colourful dresses worn by the can-can dancers of the folies Bergere. The stigma are more pronounced here and resemble a bee’s antennae. The delicacy of the colours on this gladiolus make it very attractive to the eye.

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Flashy gladiolus

We recently had an extremely stormy day, with gusts reaching up to 60mph at times. During the day, there was a tremendous rainstorm and the wind temporarily eased. This prompted the appearance of a rainbow over the sea and Dunbar harbour, and I managed to catch the rainbow behind the gladioli, which we have staked up securely against the wind.

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Rainbow over the sea and Dunbar harbour

Book of Kells exhibition and Two Dublin cathedrals

September 26, 2018

An aesthetic slant to the blog this week with a focus on design and architecture. On our recent trip to Dublin, we visited Trinity College Dublin to see the Book of Kells exhibition. The Book of Kells has uncertain origins but it is thought to have been written around 800 CE by monks from Iona, an island off the west coast of Scotland and Kells, a town in Ireland. The monks fled Iona after a Viking attack and settled in Kells. Where exactly parts of the manuscript – a bible – were written is uncertain. The Book of Kells is wonderfully illustrated and the exhibition contains blown up pages which are shown on the walls, as in the photo below. This page shows in detail saints, angels and demons interspersed with Celtic designs. This demonstrates the superb skills of the monks who completed these lavish and extremely time-consuming illustrations. In other pages, there are beautifully designed letters by one of the artists who was ” capable of ornament of such extraordinary fineness and delicacy, that his skills have been likened to those of a goldsmith”

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Page from the Book of Kells (Click on all photos to enlarge)

The exhibition also looks at the technical aspects of book production as in the photo below, showing that the manuscript was written and illustrated on vellum. In some cases, the treating the vellum could not have been a pleasant experience. Thus the preparation of the vellum as well as the composition of the book was laborious. As the Book of Kells was written in Latin and in the early 9th century, very few people would have been able to read it, apart from monks. These early religious works reflect their historical era i.e. the contents of the book were to be read to the mainly illiterate population, not read by them.

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Information from the Book of Kells exhibition

You can see more of the illustrations from the exhibition in the video below.

The exhibition then leads visitors upstairs to the Long Room of Trinity College Library and an impressive sight it is. The first photo below shows the high ceiling, packed book stacks and busts of famous philosophers and scientists. This room houses the library’s rare book collection and we passed a nearby room where scholars wearing gloves were examining some of the old books.

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The Long Room in Trinity College Dublin library

The 2nd photo shows the high book shelves and one of the many ladders needed by the library staff to retrieve the books. The natural light coming through the window might be seen as a metaphor for the enlightening knowledge contained in the books. The library is one of the UK and Ireland’s legal deposit libraries and thus holds a copy of all books printed in the UK and Ireland. I’m proud to know that the library contains all of my academic books and my recent local history book.

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Bookshelves and ladder in Trinity College Dublin library

Following lunch in the excellent Fallon and Byrne food hall, we headed to see two cathedrals, which we assumed were Catholic (capital C). We then entered a world of semantics. Both cathedrals are Church of Ireland. A leaflet in Christ Church cathedral noted that while it was Catholic, it was not Roman Catholic i.e. it did not owe allegiance to the pope. Having established the present day status of both cathedrals – both of which were originally Roman Catholic before the reformation – we could admire the architecture and internal design.

St Patrick’s Cathedral has well-groomed gardens and lawns outside and there is an outstanding sculpture, The Liberty Bell shown below. There were many people enjoying the sunshine in the cathedral grounds on the day we visited.

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Liberty Bell outside St Patrick’s Cathedral in Dublin

Inside the cathedral, there is a highly ornamental lectern made of brass, with a fierce-looking eagle at the top, seen below.

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Lectern in St Patrick’s Cathedral in Dublin

One of the most attractive features of Christ church Cathedral is the floor tiling  (scroll down to Medieval Floor Tiles). Some of the tiles are the original medieval ones laid in the 13th century, while most are 16th century reproductions, using  the same design. The circular patterns in the wide aisles are most impressive. The photos below show the flooring in front of the main altar and a close up view of one of the circular features.

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Flooring in Christ Church Cathedral Dublin

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Intricate flooring in Christ Church Cathedral Dublin

The visits to the exhibition and cathedrals were both a learning and an aesthetic experience. If you are in Dublin, go and see them.

The Seamus Heaney Archives Exhibition in Dublin

September 17, 2018

We were in Dublin last week for 4 days. The main impetus for our going was to see the Seamus Heaney – my favourite poet – archives exhibition in the Bank of Ireland Cultural Centre on the city’s famous College Green. We had heard the excellent preview of the exhibition on a Front Row podcast which is well worth listening to. As you enter the building, you see the poster for the exhibition which shows Heaney looking contemplative.

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Seamus Heaney Exhibition in Dublin (Click on all photos to enlarge)

The first section deals with Heaney’s childhood and features 2 famous poems by him relating to his mother and father. The first is the 3rd sonnet from Clearances and here is Heaney reading it. Listen out for ” Like solder weeping off the soldering iron” and “Her breath in mine, our fluent dipping knives”. It is a very moving poem.

At my own mother’s funeral, I wrote a eulogy for her and included another Heaney poem in which he refers to “the cool clothes off the line” and folding sheets with his mother. They held the sheet and either end and “flapped and shook the fabric like sail in a cross wind”. The sheet then made “a dried-out, undulating thwack”. I am sure many people remember such happenings.

The poem in memory of his father – Digging – is even more famous. Below is a compilation of BBC clips of Heaney reading this poem. The poem begins “Between my finger and my thumb/ The squat pen rests; snug as a gun”. You can imagine a “squat” fountain pen in the poet’s hands. He then looks out of the window to see his father digging and he remembers his father digging potatoes 20 years before. The children picked the potatoes “Loving their cool hardness in our hands”. Heaney then reflects on his grandfather, who ” cut more turf in a day/ Than any other man on Toner’s bog”. This is a very physical poem but the poet also reflects on his own trade, stating that “But I’ve no spade to follow men like them./ Between my finger and my thumb/ The squat pen rests./ I’ll dig with it”. The repetition of the first lines are made more effective by the statement that Heaney will “dig” with his pen and be creative in another, less physical way.

The exhibition also covers Heaney’s poetical reflections on The Troubles in Northern Ireland in the 1970s and 1980s. In his poem Punishment, Heaney describes – graphically but also lovingly – the skeleton of a woman found in an Irish bog. At the end of the poem, he makes a subtle comment on the tarring and feathering of women in Ireland during The Troubles. Listening to Heaney reading the poem at the exhibition was a very moving experience. Here it is.

The final poem that sticks out in my memory from the exhibition is The Rain Stick which is a hollowed out cactus branch into which small stones have been put. These were used by tribes in South America to bring rain. Heaney’s take on the stick is that it sounds like rain when shaken. This poem shows the musicality in much of Heaney’s poetry and when you hear the poems read, as in the clips above, you can hear the melodies in Heaney’s language. The poem begins

Upend the rain stick and what happens next
Is a music that you never would have known
To listen for. In a cactus stalk

Downpour, sluice-rush, spillage and backwash
Come flowing through. You stand there like a pipe
Being played by water, you shake it again lightly

And diminuendo runs through all its scales
Like a gutter stopping trickling. And now here comes
A sprinkle of drops out of the freshened leaves,

Then subtle little wets off grass and daisies;
Then glitter-drizzle, almost breaths of air.

I urge you to read this poem out loud to yourself or get someone to read it to you. Then you will hear the rain in the “Downpour, sluice-rush, spillage” and “glitter-drizzle”. We came away from this exhibition uplifted by Heaney’s words and voice and also regretful that this Nobel Prize winning poet only lived until he was 74. If you can get to see it, then you must do so. If not, this introduction will give you a flavour of this entrancing exhibition.