Archive for the ‘vegetables’ Category

Prague Nights and the Food Programme on seeds

September 10, 2018

I have just finished reading Benjamin Black’s intriguing historical novel Prague Nights. Benjamin Black is the well-known pen name of award-winning Irish writer John Banville and in this novel, which could be described as crime fiction also, we get a mixture of the lyrical writing of Banville and the more playful writing of Black. The novel begins “Few now recall that it was I who discovered the corpse of Dr Kroll’s misfortunate daughter thrown upon the snow that night in Golden Lane” – a good crime novel starts with a body. Further on we read “Such stars there were! – like a hoard of jewels strewn across a dome of taut black silk” and this is more Banville than  Black. I got the impression that Black/Banville was having fun in creating the characters in this novel. Firstly , there is the protagonist Christian Stern, a by turns over-confident and fearful young man who comes to Prague in 1599 and finds a dead body in the street. Stern is fortunate that the emperor Rudolf II, whose dead mistress Stern has found, sees the new arrival as an omen for good and adopts Stern as his protégé. He also demands that Stern finds out how murdered the young woman. Secondly, there is the lascivious seductress Caterina  Sardo with whom Stern has a torrid affair. Stern quickly finds out the machinations of Rudolf’s court and discovers that he can trust no-one, including Sardo – a partly comic character. The city of Prague in winter is another character in the novel – this is really a novel with (no spoiler here) more than one murder, rather than a crime novel – and Black gives a detailed account of the abject poverty and  lush richness at both ends of the social spectrum. For those hoping for a fast-moving plot, this is not for you. The author’s plot is meandering but gets there in the end. What you remember is not so much whodunit but where it was done, who was involved and what will happen to Christian Stern, who at times has a seemingly precarious existence. Black/Banville is always worth reading for the quality of the prose and the laconic wit. Highly recommended.

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Benjamin Black’s engrossing historical novel (Click on all photos to enlarge)

A recent Food Programme podcast caught my ears to good effect. The topic was seeds and the programme covered a range of different aspects of the grain which humans have used over the millennia for food and drink. The programme begins with an interview with Noel Kingsbury, the author of Hybrid: The History and Science of Plant Breeding who states that today’s “natural” foods which people increasing seek out, are in fact the results of “selective breeding and hybridisation over thousands of years”, although that does not make them less healthy than processed food. Another interviewee notes that legislation has meant that many varieties of seeds are now privately owned and that some “traditional” seed varieties are not covered and cannot be sold. One organisation trying to preserve seed varieties in the UK is the Heritage Seed Library at Garden Organics in Ryton, Coventry and the work of the library, which encourages people to grow and swap unusual varieties of vegetables, is discussed in the programme. There are now a range of programmes across the world which seek to preserve seed varieties threatened with extinction and some of these programmes research the quality of wheat and barley seeds before giving them to farmers to grow. I found this a fascinating programme, so give it a go. This issue of the Food Programme coincides with harvest time here in East Lothian and it is a real pleasure to cycle around the countryside past fields where the farmers have left bales to stand and be admired. I think that it should be compulsory for farmers to do this, as an aesthetic contribution to the countryside, rather than removing the bales immediately. This year, I have noticed more square bales, such as these taken at St Abbs head recently.

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Square bales, farm buildings and sheep in the field at St Abbs Head

 

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Horses, trees, square bales and hills at St Abbs Head

Finally, a photo of round bales first featured here in 2014. This was a field of barley from which beer is made and in Dunbar we have our own Belhaven Brewery, the oldest in Scotland.

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Round bales in a North Belton Farm field, near Dunbar

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Fredensborg Slot – the lake, the palace and the gardens

August 22, 2018

Our final destination on the trip to Denmark and Sweden was back in Denmark. We crossed on the ferry from Helsingborg (good photos) in Sweden to Helsingor in Denmark. Helsingor is famous for its Kronborg Castle (good photos) which is best known as the setting for Shakespeare’s play Hamlet. The photo below shows the castle as seen from the ferry.

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Approaching Kronborg Castle on the ferry to Helsingor (Click on all photos to enlarge)

Our destination was the pretty town of Fredensborg (good photos) which is mainly known for the Fredensborg Slot or Castle, of which more below. You can walk down – through an avenue of lime trees – to the shore of the huge Lake Esrum, the 2nd largest in Denmark, from the town and we enjoyed the views across the lake. We also drove to Nødebo on the other side of the lake. When we arrived, this family of mallard ducks was next to the walkway. They were undisturbed by our presence and posed for this photo.

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Mallard family at Lake Esrum

We went on a tour of Fredensborg Slot – slot being the Danish for castle or palace. As this is the Queen of Denmark’s residence for part of the year, it was referred to as a palace by  the guide. You are not allowed to photograph inside the palace. The guide gave us  a history of the palace and told us much about the present queen and her family. In doing so, he tended to ignore the many beautiful objects and furnishings inside the palace. The tour of the gardens was much more interesting, with an enthusiastic guide – a tall, sturdy, bearded young Dane who was passionate about horticulture. Previous to the tour, we walked around the lawns and trees of the palace grounds – you can do this for free. There is a very peaceful walk down an avenue of lime trees (picture below) and there was resonant birdsong all the way down towards the edge of the lake.

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A walk through the lime/linden trees at Fredensborg Slot

The paid tour took us into the private gardens and they were a delight to the eye. The first part of the gardens is the formal rose garden and looking down from the steep bank above the gardens, you can see (photo below) the immaculately manicured hedges in the small maze-like structure, as well as the numerous statues around this section.

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Formal gardens at Fredensborg Slot

The next section was the rose garden, with its impressive water lilies at the side of the roses. I took a wee video of this.

From there it was on to some small gardens – one for each season, so some were in full flower and others more subdued – and then to the huge vegetable and herb garden. At the entrance to the garden was this peach tree. I like the photo below as the exposed trunk takes your eye up the centre of the tree and then on to the dangling leaves, behind which the maturing peaches seem to lurk.

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Peach tree at Fredensborg Slot

The vegetable garden has a huge range of vegetables – potatoes, carrots, leeks, cabbages, lettuce and beetroot – and each section was separated by a small hedge as in the photo below.

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Fredensborg Slot vegetable garden

When you walk through the middle of the vegetable garden, you are under a trellis of roses (photo below) and it really was a pleasure to walk under the roses, with neat boxed hedge on the border. Inside the hedge were wild strawberries which were heavily fruited. You can see more photos of the vegetable garden here.

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Rose trellis at Fredensborg Slot

This was an afternoon well spent and I would recommend Fredensborg as a place to visit when in Denmark.

Tyninghame House and gardens

July 2, 2018

Last Sunday, we went to see the gardens at Tyninghame (pr Tinning’am) House, which were open for the day as part of Scotland’s Gardens Scheme, which features a wide range of gardens in Scotland which are not normally open to the public. Tyninghame House is a magnificent looking structure. The brochure we bought tells us that there had been a residence there since medieval times, but the modern building was developed in the late 1820s by the architect William Burn.

In the first photo below, you get an idea of the extensive parts that make up the house. It was the seat of the earls of Haddington for centuries and is now broken up into flats. It retains its impressiveness when you look at the quality of the sandstone walls, the turret and the unusual chimneys. A critical eye might think that it is overcomplicated, with turrets and chimneys vying for space, but as walk around it, you can appreciate the architect’s achievement.

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Tyninghame House and part of the gardens

In the 2nd photo, you get a better view of the smoothly conical towers – dunces’ hats to some – and the rectangular chimneys. The stonework on the rounded towers is outstanding, so the masons at the time must have been very skilful to achieve such sandstone elegance.

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The turrets and chimneys of Tyninghame House

So to the gardens, which you come across immediately you walk behind the tall hedges in front of the house. The parterre is what you first see and consists of a series of beds which are edged by box hedge and feature a number of rose varieties. The brochure informs us that the roses are “mainly white Iceberg and yellow King’s Ransom and Graham Thomas”. The King’s Ransom roses were most impressive and had a delicate scent. In one of the beds, mainly filled with flowering peony roses, a delicate white rose had emerged between the more blowsy peony roses, see the photo below.

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A rose fights for space with the larger peony rose flowers

At the south side of the house, you can walk through the trees to a vegetable garden, which is of course much smaller now than it would have been when such houses were self-sufficient in fruit and vegetables. A set of stairs leads you up to a small courtyard and on each side of the steps is an attractive Grecian-type urn. The photo below shows one of these and the leaves on the urn are nicely complemented by the yellow roses behind and the newly flowering lavender

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Decorative urn at the south side of Tyninghame House

To the west of the house is the Secret Garden which was created in the 1950s. The brochure refers to the date as a cringeworthy 1950’s. When I was teaching, I got to the stage of telling my students not to use apostrophes unless they knew how to do so. The photo below shows the “white painted gazebo sheltering a statue of Flora, the Roman goddess of flowers and spring”. This is a very peaceful garden even in the presence of the many visitors, you could feel that it would be a haven to come to on a quieter day. Again, the border is of fragrant lavender and the roses include Gertrude Jekyll (good photo) and Bloomfield Abundance (good photo). Many of the roses had delicate but beautiful scent, unlike many roses you get in flower shops today.

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White gazebo in the Secret Garden at Tyninghame House

When you see the various colourful beds of roses at Tyninghame House, you can’t fail to think of Elvis Costello and …

At the end of our tour of the gardens, which included the exquisite lawns and hedges of the walled garden, the wilderness and the herbaceous border, we walked down the avenue of lime trees to St Baldred’s church (good photos) which is an attractive ruin. The guidebook tells us that “Two fine arches remain from the church enriched with chevron ornamentation” and these can be seen in the photo below. The church was first built in the 12th century and added to and changed in the 17th and 18th centuries. It lies in an idyllic spot, surrounded by farmland and trees. The stonework on the arches is remarkably well preserved and there are many shades of pink and grey in the sandstone of the church.

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The remains of St Baldred’s church at Tyninghame House

On the day, we visited, a herd of cows in the field next to the church were curious onlookers to the numerous visitors to the church’s ruin. For one calf, however, feeding time was more important, as you can see in the final photo.

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Cows in the field at Tyninghame House

You can see the extent of the house and the gardens in the wee video I made during our tour of Tyninghame House gardens. Ignore the first 4 seconds, as I have yet to learn how to delete sections in Movie Maker.

 

Making soup and the Crystal Palace in Madrid

November 3, 2017

Back to normal after a very successful trip to Pisa and Florence, of which more later. There’s an old Scottish saying relating to being on holiday and returning to the usual routine – “It’s back tae auld claes and parritich” i.e. back to old clothes and porridge. It’s not cold enough yet for me to have porridge in the morning but a new pot of soup is welcome all the year round. Today, I was making courgette, and basil soup. It’s fairly straightforward with the following ingredients: 1 medium leek, 4 good sized courgettes, one large potato and dried basil. Now I know that a good many people who read this blog will call courgettes zucchinis. This source claims that there are differences between the two e.g. that courgettes are smaller than zucchinis, but I think that the only real difference is in where the terms are used – courgette in France, the UK and (so the website claims) South Africa and New Zealand; zucchini in Australia and North America. I’m not sure about New Zealand, so a comment on that would be good. To start, sweat your chopped leek in a little oil, to which you have already added the dried basil – amount according to taste. In your solid soup pan, it should look like this i.e. a thing of beauty that might be submitted for the Turner Prize as a work of contemporary art, signifying the integration of human thoughts and deeds across the newly green world. On the other hand, it’s still a thing of beauty but a photo of leeks.

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Leeks sweated in oil and basil. (Click to enlarge all photos)

I never use a processor to chop my vegetables. There is something calming about washing your leek, cutting it into 3 and then slicing it up, although this obviously has overtones of violence. Add the chopped courgette and, magically, you have another potential submission to the prize, representing …mmm you tell me. It now looks and smells very good.

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Chopped courgettes and leeks in basil and oil.

To this, you add the peeled and chopped potato and one litre of the stock of your choice – I used chicken stock cubes. Simmer for about 20 min and take off the heat. I then mashed it down with a potato masher and then liquidised it with my hand-held blender, one of the best kitchen implements in which I have ever invested.

Here is one serving of the soup, with the chopped end of a 70% wholemeal loaf from Dunbar Community Bakery.  This raises another philosophical issue – what do you call the last slice in a loaf of bread? My wife would say heel, while in my family when I was growing up, it was always called the outsider. A relative called it the Tommy – rhyming slang for Tommy Steele perhaps? What did your family call the last slice? Another Turner Prize entrant – the four islands in the speckled green sea: the post-nuclear world. Discuss.

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Courgette and basil soup with fresh bread croutons

For the final posting on Madrid, I swithered between the magnificence of Madrid’s cathedral – especially the internal colours – and the Crystal Palace in El Retiro Park, featured here recently . Having been out cycling this morning in the cool, fresh air and enjoying the autumnal spectacle of the countryside at the moment, I chose the latter. While walking through the large park, it’s easy to miss the sign to the Crystal Palace  or Palacio de Cristal, to give it its proper name. Once you see not only the palace itself but the setting, you cannot be unimpressed. The first photo shows what you see approaching the palace – a light filled building on 3 levels, with beautiful arches over the windows and ornate decoration around the bottom, a close-up of which is shown in the 2nd photo – here is a swan – like, mythical bird, with no feet and a tail of flowers.

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Palacio de Cristal in El Retiro Park, Madrid

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Decoration on tiles at the Palacio de Cristal in El Retiro Park, Madrid

Once you pass the entrance to the palace, which has been closed for a long time for internal redecoration, you can walk around the large pond, with its fountain. You pass the tall, thick-trunked trees whose leaves differed in colour,  from light green to dark green to reddish-brown. You can then see across the pond to the palace. It’s a very peaceful place, made even more pleasant by the late September sunshine and 25 degrees. The final 2 photos show the palace from the side of the pond and from the opposite side of the pond to the palace. This is a slice of remote countryside which has been picked up and placed near the centre of one of Europe’s busiest cities. The Madrilenos are lucky to have it.

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The pond, the trees and the fountain at the Palacio de Cristal in El Retiro Park, Madrid

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Looking across the pond to the Palacio de Cristal in El Retiro Park, Madrid

Trip to Durham: the Cathedral and the Cellar Door restaurant.

September 30, 2017

I forgot to say at the end of the last post that we were off to Madrid for a week, so no more posts for a fortnight. At the beginning of September, we went to Durham for a couple of days. We had been before but only for the day. The cathedral city of Durham (good photos and short video) is in the north east of England, so for us it was only a 2 hr drive. We stayed in a hotel next to the River Wear, a short walk from the city centre. Durham has a famous castle, with a fascinating history but we did not have time to visit as we went to the coast as well. We did go to Durham Cathedral (good photos) and it certainly is an impressive sight, both from the exterior and interior. The first photo below shows part of the outside walls of the cathedral and there is a fascinating array of structures here – the round towers, arched windows and varied stonework. As I  have said here before, it must have been strange for the local inhabitants to see the construction of something so huge on their doorstep, as they worked in the fields. Also, the workmanship is astounding, given that the cathedral would have been build using, by modern standards, fairly basic tools. Imagine being a stonemason working at the top of one of the towers, standing on wooden scaffolding, with no thought given to health and safety.

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Part of the exterior from outside the cathedral (Click to enlarge all photos)

The interior of the cathedral has cloisters (good photos) and the next 2 photos show part of the cloisters and more of the cathedral’s exteriors. Cloisters were important to the monks who lived in the cathedral and as you walk along the cloisters, you can see how such an environment would provide a peaceful and contemplative atmosphere.

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Looking up from the cloisters in Durham Cathedral

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Looking across the green from one part of the cloisters to another in Durham Cathedral

We visited the Open Treasures exhibition (good video) which provided a fascinating insight to the lives of the monks, as well as showing some intricately carved stonework from the cathedral and elsewhere, and examples of manuscripts and jewellery. You can’t take photos inside the exhibition or inside the cathedral but you can see some excellent photographs here.

As you leave and pass through the magnificent external doors of the cathedral, you can see the dramatic Sanctuary Knocker (photo below) which could be used in the past by those seeking protection in the cathedral from the law. It looks more frightening than welcoming and maybe it was meant to. My thoughts on seeing it were of masks worn by South American tribes or carvings on totem poles. Whether you are religious or humanist, the cathedral is an inspiring building and well worth a visit.

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The Sanctuary Knocker on Durham Cathedral.

One of the highlights of our visit was to the exquisite Cellar Door restaurant and it turned out to be a real treat. It is an exquisitely furnished dining room, as the photo below shows. The service was helpful, attentive and unfussy and customers were made very welcome.

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The Cellar Door, Durham dining room

The restaurant offers a varied and interesting menu. For starters, I had the “Courgette flower, yellison goat’s cheese, Yemeni wild flower honey and hazelnuts” and my wife had “Mushrooms on toast – cep parfait, shemeji, girolles, mushroom ketchup and sourdough”. Both looked and tasted exceptional and my wife’s comment was that this was the best mushroom starter that she’d ever had. The courgette flower was delicately cooked in a light batter, with the goat’s cheese inside. For main, I had “Sea trout, avocado, heritage tomato, crab and potato crisps” and this was a generous serving of fish, cooked to perfection, complimented nicely by the light crab meat. My wife had “Scottish halibut, beans, grapes, elderflower and verjus”, and again the fish was perfectly cooked with a crispy skin. I contacted the restaurant and they gave me permission to download the photos of the restaurant above, one of their desserts and the halibut. For dine dining of this quality, we both thought that the meal was excellent value and would recommend the restaurant to anyone visiting Durham.

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Mouth watering dessert from The Cellar Door, Durham

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Crispy halibut from the Cellar Door, Durham

Scottish Colourists’ Exhibition and home grown new tatties

August 3, 2017

The exhibition of work by the Scottish Colourists at The Granary in Berwick Upon Tweed (good photos)  had been on our list for a while. On a very wet Sunday morning a couple of weeks ago, we decided to go and it turned out to be a really pleasurable and enlightening visit. We had seen some of the work of the group who became to be known as the Scottish colourists – Peploe, Fergusson, Hunter and Cadell – in previous exhibitions at the National Gallery of Scotland. As often happens in art, the group members became most well- known after 3 of them were dead – in the 1940s, with only Fergusson living on until 1961. The exhibition’s paintings are shown in chronological order and this gives the viewer and idea of how the styles and ideas of the painters developed over the years. I was allowed to take photos and the following were works that stood out for me personally.

The first painting is “Peonies in a Chinese vase” by Leslie Hunter. The painting itself is more distinct than this photo but even here, you can see the range of colours used by Hunter. The painter wrote “The eye seeks refreshment in painting. Give it joy not mourning. Give everything a distinct outline. Avoid over finish – an impression is not so robust but that its first inspiration will be lost if we try to strengthen everything with detail.’’ In this painting, there is a mixture of realistic outlines of objects but also an impression of these objects. So I think that this makes us appreciate the form of the painting and asks us to use our imagination.

 

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“Peonies in a Chinese vase” by Leslie Hunter (Click to enlarge)

The 2nd painting is “A vase of pink roses” by S.J Peploe. While the roses are painted in greater detail than in the previous work shown, this is still not an attempt to portray the roses photographically. What attracts me to this painting are the range of shapes and lines, which give it an abstract quality. The mix of colour – ranging from the dark at the top left and bottom, to the delicate pinks and orange of the roses and the light background – provides a contrast and this makes you look at the work more closely. At first glance, this is a fairly simple picture, but when you start to look at the detail, it ends up being a very busy one.

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“A vase of pink roses by S.J. Peploe

The final painting is “Loch Creran, Argyll” by Francis Cadell. When you first see this work, it certainly is the colours that draw it to your eye. There is a superb range of colours here, with subtle changes of shade. You are almost tempted to take do a child-like exercise and spot how many shades of green and blue are here, but this is not about quantity. The loch and the surrounding mountains are depicted in what was for me a very gentle and calming flow of colours. The real Loch Creran (good photos) is a stunning location. Cadell is not aiming to replicate the real-life views. He is perhaps trying to give us an alternative view, which has a more dream-like quality.

Overall, this is an outstanding exhibition. It’s on until October, so get to see it if your are anywhere near it.

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“Loch Creran, Argyll” by Francis Cadell

From the artistic to the more practical and a different kind of taste. In an earlier blog post this year, I promised to include a picture of my emerging tattie (potato) shaws, but it slipped my mind. Over the last couple of weeks, I’ve been harvesting the early tattie crop and here is the result. In Scotland (as elsewhere) we have two crops of tatties each year – early and late. The early ones have much thinner skins than the late tatties and tend to be much more tasty. You would never peel early tatties. To do this would be the act of a philistine and make you susceptible to the wrath of the tattie gods. Now, there is a certain psychological element to planting, feeding, watering and then harvesting your own tatties. When you dig under the shaws and reveal the oval packets of flavour and nourishment, there is definitely an element of  achievement, of pleasure and a harking back to times when people grew their own food out of necessity. These tatties have a distinct flavour – you must be careful not to boil them too hard to ensure this. I could eat these on their own with just some butter.

One of my favourite poet Seamus Heaney’s most famous poems is “Digging” (Heaney reading the poem) and it contains the lines “The coarse boot nestled on the lug, the shaft/ Against the inside knee was levered firmly. / He rooted out tall tops, buried the bright edge deep/ To scatter new potatoes that we picked,/ Loving their cool hardness in our hands”. That last line is brilliant and you would need a whole paragraph to describe what the poet is saying here. Heaney has a very enviable facility with words.

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Early tattie crop in my garden

 

Harbour reflections and making Minestrone

December 14, 2016

I took my camera for a walk along to Dunbar Harbour (good photos) last week. The day was so wind free that the water in the harbour hardly moved and the wee boats, which are usually swaying gently to an unheard waltz tune on the accordion, were statuesque. It’s very unusual not to have any kind of wind in Dunbar and at one point, it looked as if the sea had given up coming into the harbour, as the water appeared – very briefly – to be motionless. Then a gentle ripple spread from the entrance to the harbour across to the boats.

The two photos below are taken at the east end of the harbour and the perfect reflection in the 1st photo shows how calm the water became. There’s a hint of movement in the water in the 2nd photo and the wee boat looks isolated. This is because all the small yachts that lie in the harbour in the summer have been removed for safety. I like the way the harbour walls are reflected in the water in the 2nd photo.

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Calm day at Dunbar Harbour

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Calm day at Dunbar Harbour

The next 2 photos are taken at the castle end of the harbour. In the first photo, the reflections look as if they might come from an impressionist painting e.g. the squiggly lines in the castle walls’ reflection. It was a cold day but the colours in the boats and in the fish boxes on the quayside inserted a warm feature into this walker’s experience. In the both photos, the castle ruins still show the white patches left by the nesting kittiwakes, who visited in the summer. The kittiwakes have featured on this blog more than once e.g. here. In the 2nd photo, the wider angle shows the castle ruins and the narrow entrance to the harbour. Another unusual feature of this visit to the harbour was the absence of birds on the water, as you often get small groups of eider duck. On this RSPB site, you can listen to the gurgling, whoo-hooing of the eider duck, and you can usually hear this from the harbourside.

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Fishing boats near Dunbar Castle

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Reflections of the ruins of Dunbar Castle

Having made lentil and vegetable, tomato and lentil, and parsnip and pear soup recently, I thought that it must be the turn of minestrone. The term minestrone comes from the Latin minestra meaning soup with pasta (and/or other ingredients) and one as a suffix meaning large, thus giving us a soup with big vegetables. The soup is mentioned in a cookbook by Apicus (the whole book from Project Gutenberg here) published in 30CE, so it has ancient traditions. You could spend the rest of your life looking at the myriad of minestrone recipes on the web i.e. almost anything goes as long as you have vegetables and pasta in it. Almost all recipes include tomatoes. Today, my minestrone has a large leek, 3 stalks of celery, diced turnip (aka swede) and carrot, dried basil and oregano, a tin of tomatoes, 2 tbs tomatoes puree and a litre of chicken stock. I put a little oil in the bottom of my large soup pan and added the basil and oregano. I then sweated the leeks and celery, and added the turnip and carrot until it looks like this:

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Sweating the vegetables in the making of minestrone

I then added the tomatoes, tomato puree and broken spaghetti, brought it  to the boil and simmered it for c20 minutes. I always find that you should never eat minestrone soup right away – let the flavours develop for at least 8 hours or preferably overnight. You can then have a colourful, tasty and winter warming soup which served up will look something like this photo from last year. Have it for lunch with crusty bread and if you are lucky like me, go for a walk along to the harbour with your camera afterwards.

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A plate of minestrone soup with basil leaves

Cooking Beef’n’Beer, RSNO Concert and tulips

February 2, 2016

We were having family over for a meal last week and we decided to cook something that has been off our menu for a few years. Beef’n’Beer i.e. beef cooked in beer is very simple but very tasty, and has the added value of a crusty bread topping. We’ve had a Le Creuset casserole dish for many years and the wee book that came with the dish has the recipe in it – now it’s online here. For my Beef’n’Beer, I used round steak instead of the beef chuck  (aka chuck steak) in the book. Round steak is much more tender and certainly takes less time to cook – it’s also much less fatty. For four of us, I bought 1.5lbs (0.68KG) of round steak. In our local butcher’s, everyone still asks for their meat in a pound, three quarters of a pound, half a pound or just “a quarter” e.g. of cold meat. I covered the steak lightly in flour and gently browned it in some Flora oil. I then added 2 medium sized shallots (I sometimes use a red onion) , a garlic clove, 2 thickly sliced carrots, 2 bay leaves, some dried thyme and rosemary (the recipe recommends fresh herbs) and some fresh parsley from my garden. After the shallots had softened, I added a bottle of real ale, in this case, a bottle of locally brewed Belhaven St Andrews Ale. I cooked this in the oven at 180 degrees Centigrade for about an hour and 15 minutes – you are always better to try it for tenderness after an hour. You can eat the dish on its own but adding the topping makes all the difference. I cut thick slices from a large baguette bought in our local community bakery (photo below) and covered the top of each slice with some Dijon  mustard  (interesting article). Two things are key here. Firstly, you need to make sure that you have enough liquid for serving the meat, as the bread will soak up some of it. Secondly, you need to squeeze the slices to maximise the number of slices – I allocated 2 slices per person. You put the dish back in the oven and in 20 minutes, the bread should be going brown at the edges. I served it with mash potatoes and broccoli but other vegetables  e.g. peas, green beans or buttered carrots would do as well. It is very tasty and …. roll of the drums... this is what it looks like.

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Beef’n’Beer cooked in a Le Creuset dish.

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Dunbar Community Bakery

I haven’t been to a classical music concert for years although every year I’ve promised myself that I will do so. Last week, I took the plunge and went to the Brunton Theatre in Musselburgh which is half an hour’s drive from Dunbar, to see the Royal Scottish National Orchestra. The concert started with the lively Romanian Concerto (very good video) by Ligeti, a composer unknown to me. Ligeti was a Hungarian composer who received many honours for his wide range of works. The second part was Mozart’s enchanting Bassoon Concerto in B Flat Major (video of the piece), featuring the principal bassoonist of the RSNO, David Hubbard (interesting video). It was fascinating to see how Hubbard controlled his instrument and seemed intent on getting the best out of it. The sound was melodious and you could not help but admire this man’s craft. The main event of the evening was Brahms’ Symphony No 4 (video of the whole concert with Daniel Barenboim). To this uninitiated listener, this was a melodic and joyous symphony with a combination of slower, softer sections and a crescendo of a final section. For a more detailed analysis – and a much darker view of the piece – see Tom Service’s review. So, a very enjoyable concert – the only thing missing being my camera. The photo below is included by permission of the RSNO.

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Section of the RSNO

We’re still in thick of winter in Dunbar but it’s now February and my garden is suddenly strewn with emerging heads of daffodils and a few tulip heads have also appeared. Today, with Storm Henry approaching, they are being blown about relentlessly. Inside the house, safely and serenely arranged in a vase are a bunch of multi-coloured tulips. These tulips are a welcome flash of colour, and a promise of Spring being not so far away, on an intermittently dark and windy day. Tulips have their origins in Turkey and came to Europe in the 17th century. An interesting fact from this website is that multi-coloured tulips were originally diseased but the modern versions are safe hybrids. The first photo shows the tulips in a resplendent array of contrasting colours, offset by the green of the stems. The second photo is taken from above the flowers and shows them in a completely different way, possibly bursting into song or yelling with pain at being shown at such an unflattering angle?

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A dazzling array of tulips

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Tulips from above

Sylvia Plath wrote “The tulips are too excitable, it is winter here” in a rather melancholy poem entitled Tulips. A much more joyous celebration of tulips comes from A E Stallings and she writes “The tulips make me want to paint” and “Something about the way they twist/ As if to catch the last applause” which could be an acute commentary on the 2nd photo.

 

 

La Garrigue and Bamburgh visit

October 28, 2015

A fine restaurant and a spectacular castle in this week’s blog. We recently had lunch at La Garrigue in Edinburgh. The website has a short and interesting video by the owner Jean Michel Gauffre. We went with old friends (my pal Tam and I went to school together aged 5) and of the four of us, only my wife had been before. We had an excellent lunch with well cooked and very tasty food, very attentive (but not intrusive) and friendly service, in this very attractive restaurant. I’m not a great lover of sardines but went for the sardine pâté. The pâté was moist and quite delicate and was served with sliced baked apple – a superb combination. My wife and friends all chose the fish of the day which was sea bass fillets, served with rice, mussels and a tasty sauce. I chose the guinea fowl which was cooked perfectly and had a jus with a real depth of flavour. We all had a dessert and Tam had a fine selection of cheese from Henri of Stockbridge. My chocolate mousse – a very generous portion – went down very well. The lunch menu offers 3 courses for £17 and this could be the best value quality lunch in Edinburgh. We will definitely be back. Jean Michel kindly allowed me to download these photos from the website.

La Garrigue restaurant, Edinburgh

La Garrigue restaurant, Edinburgh

Superb dish from La Garrigue, Edinburgh

Superb dish from La Garrigue, Edinburgh

At the weekend, we drove an hour from Dunbar into the north east England village of Bamburgh (pr Bam – burra) (good photos) to watch our son Jonathan run (and finish 7th in) the RunCastles Marathon. This is a tough race, physically because of the long climbs in part of the race, and mentally because of the long stretches of country road with high hedges. This must be a marathon with one of the most spectacular backdrops at the finish, with the huge and imposing Bamburgh Castle looking down imperiously on the finishers as in the photo below.

Our son at the finish of the marathon in Bamburgh

Our son at the finish of the marathon in Bamburgh

Bamburgh Castle’s history goes back to the 6th century with aspects of the castle including the huge walls and the Great Tower being built in the 12th century. It must have been amazing for peasants working in the fields in the 12th century to see this (to them) extraordinarily massive structure being built, as it was unlikely that they would have seen anything larger than their local church. Bamburgh Castle was built to show the power of the kings of England over many years, as well as to provide an impregnable fortress near the border with Scotland.

Bamburgh Castle

Bamburgh Castle

Behind the castle is the extensive Bamburgh Beach, a long, flat stretch of pristine beach and a superb walk in all seasons. We walked in the October sunshine with the white-topped waves easing their way to the shore. From the beach, you can see the Farne Islands (photo below) which is famous for its puffin colonies and, further in the distance, Lindisfarne. In the village itself, you can visit the Grace Darling Museum as well as St Aidan’s Church with its historic graveyard (photo below).

Farne Islands from Bamburgh Beach

Farne Islands from Bamburgh Beach

St Aidan's church Bamburgh

St Aidan’s church Bamburgh

Bamburgh has a range of pubs and tea rooms, gift shops, an excellent butcher and Clark’s standout vegetable store within the famous walled garden. It has an impressive range of fruit and vegetables, as in the photo below.

Clark's vegetables in Bamburgh

Clark’s vegetables in Bamburgh