Posts Tagged ‘balconies’

Bordeaux visit (2) – architecture, statues and concert at Le Grand Theatre

May 30, 2017

As with all the cities we visit, I took photos of the main tourist attractions, such as La Place de la Bourse (photo 1), with its magnificent frontage, large open square and the intriguing  Three Graces Fountain (photo 2) which features the daughters of Zeus.

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Place de la Bourse in Bordeaux (Click to enlarge)

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La Fontaine de Trois Graces in Bordeaux

Opposite La Bourse is a modern feature – Le Mirroir D’Eau (The Water Mirror). which is the world’s largest reflecting pool. This is a fascinating concept. Firstly, there are wonderful reflections of parts of the city e.g. in the photo below. Secondly, this is somewhere open to all and children and adults splash in the water. Thirdly, at intervals, a mist arises from the water and this is also enjoyed by the public, who walk through it, and by photographers. Le Mirroir is an excellent of a piece of public sculpture and landscaping which is both aesthetic and utilitarian, giving joy to many people.

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Le Mirroir D’eau in Bordeaux

It’s a very photogenic city, with some very interesting architectural features e.g. Le Grosse Cloche (good photos) and impressive statues e.g. La Fontaine des Girondins (good photos).

On the penultimate day of our holiday, we planned to do a tour of Le Grand Theatre (more below), visit Le Palais Rohan (short video) and the Basilique San Michel (good photos). We had a walk around the magnificent church but we didn’t have time to climb the tower, which is recommended for the views across the city (see website). As with cathedrals across Europe and beyond, the stonework is stunning and you have to admire the craftsmanship of the workers who built it, with medieval equipment i.e. no health and safety and not stone cutting machines. We had been to the tourist information office where the staff are friendly and generally excellent. However, they told us that we could get tickets to tour Le Palais Rohan at the palace itself. We went along and a sign said it was open at 2.30pm. We went back at the appointed time, only to be told that we needed to get tickets at the tourist information office! So, we walked back to Le Grand Theatre(short video), the home of Opera Bordeaux. When we went to book the tour, there was more frustration as the very helpful young lady told us that all the tours were full that day and the next day. Then our luck changed, as she told us that on that evening, there was a concert – and it only cost 10 euros. This was a great opportunity not only to see the interior of the theatre but to attend a performance. Going to Le Grand Theatre is normally a very expensive business.

The concert we attended featured a choir of men and women, a pianist, a conductor and three soloists. Here is the cover of the programme.

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Concert programme at Le Grand Theatre in Bordeaux

Le Choeur de L’Opera National de Bordeaux (video of choir performing around Bordeaux) are led by the enthusiastic Salvatore Caputo and highly talented pianist Martine Marcuz. For this event, the choir, in 2 sections of males and females, were in superb form and performed the songs with great feeling and obvious enjoyment, and the two female and one male soloists were outstanding. The evening consisted of 18 songs related to wine and beer drinking and cafes. Examples are Verdi’s Fuoco di Gioia (video) and although the the choir were accompanied only on piano and not with an orchestra (as in the link above), they were just as effective and in some ways, the lack of an orchestra made the choir more accessible to the audience. They also performed Vaughn Williams’ Wassail Song (video) which was described in the programme as a Chanson a boire (drinking song) and they gave a lively version of it. This was a real piece of luck on our part and a very memorable evening in a grand setting. The two photos below were taken on a mobile phone, so are not the best but they do show the stage as we saw it and some of the balconies.

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Stage at Le Grand Theatre I Bordeaux

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Balconies of Le Grand Theatre in Bordeaux

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San Sebastian: beach and museum, and Santander’s bronze figures

September 27, 2016

We spent three days in San Sebastian, the picturesque resort which is close to the French border on the Bay of Biscay. The internationally renowned San Sebastian Film Festival began while we were there – in the pouring rain. Fortunately, the previous two days were warm and sunny and we could walk along the semi-circular promenade next to the beach. This is similar to the Promenade Des Anglais in Nice and all day and well into the evening, people from a multitude of nations stroll along, looking at each other and wondering where everyone comes from. They also look at the wide sweep of beach where swimmers and surfers enjoy the breaking waves. On a sunny day, as in the photos below, the colours are contrasting – blue/turquoise sea and white waves; blue sky and white clouds.

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San Sebastian beach

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San Sebastian Beach

At  the end of the prom is a funicular railway which takes you to the top of Mount Igueldo from which you get spectacular views across the bay and far into the mountains.

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San Sebastian from Mount Igueldo

San Sebastian is famous for its food with a number of 3 star Michelin restaurants in the city such as the famous Arzak which offers a delicious tasting menu with a glass of champagne, although this will cost you about £150 per person. We thought we’d keep it for our next visit. We also went to the San Telmo Museum (good photos) which is near the sea front. This gave a fascinating insight into the history of the Basque people, in particular their agrarian background. While the first part of the museum is very modern, you walk through cloisters with beautiful ceilings (photo below) into an old church with its dramatic frescoes by Josep Maria Serp. One of the key features that you immediately see in San Sebastian (and to a lesser extent in Bilbao) is the prominent use of the Basque language. San Sebastian is the Spanish for Donostia, the Basque name for the town. All signs and menus are in Euskera, the Basque language, first and then in Spanish and then in French.

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San Telmo Museum cloister ceiling

Our last port of call was Santander where we only stayed one night but could have stayed longer. The town has a large ferry port and extensive promenade which leads to it sandy beaches (good photos). On the promenade, there are four bronze figures (good photos) of young boys, one of whom is diving into the water and it is fascinating to look at the figures from different angles.

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Los Racqueros in Santander

Like Bilbao and San Sebastian, the architecture in Santander is outstanding with many balcony strewn buildings which are kept in very good condition, as below. This was a new part of Spain for us but it comes highly recommended for many reasons.

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Santander architecture

Bilbao: Architecture, pintxos and the Guggenheim Museum

September 22, 2016

 A delayed post as we were in the north of Spain for the whole of last week. We spent the first 3 days in the very attractive city of Bilbao. This is an architecturally outstanding city with some very grand buildings in the main street, the Gran Via (good photos) and lots of narrow streets in the old town (click on photos), with tall buildings featuring some very elegant balconies as in the photos below. Bilbao is a city to explore on foot, to be a tourist and stroll down one street after another, passing the niche shops and many, many eating places. One of the gastronomic features of the Basque country is their pintxos – a Basque word for a small bite-sized snack, with a crusty bread slice for a base and a wide variety of toppings e.g. cream cheese and smoked salmon or prawn. You choose your pintxos (pr pinchos) from the range displayed on the bar and in some bars, the range was extensive. We did not find one which was not a very tasty lunchtime snack to accompany a beer, glass of wine or sangria.

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Old town Bilbao

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Balconies in Bilbao

The highlight of our visit to Bilbao – indeed of our whole trip – was a visit to the magnificent Guggenheim Museum  (good photos). The building itself is a work of art with its various shapes at the front and back and on the roof. The photo below shows the approach to the main entrance. You have to stop and take in the enormity of the building, which looks complicated at first, until your eyes go over the curves and folds.

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The front of the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao

If you think there’s a definite Wow factor to the outside of the building, when you go inside, you will be amazed at the height of the Atrium, with its huge expanses of glass and large tiled walls, with light flooding in from a skylight 3 floors above you. The architect Frank Gehry’s design (good photos and drawings) is breath-taking. You look up to a long shapely glass curtain which you then discover is a shield for the elevator. Then to your left, you see a curved tiled block on a plinth which rises to the upper floors. The excellent free audio commentary tells you that none of the tiles are exactly the same shape. The first photo shows the glass curtain and the second shows the tiled block.

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Glass curtain in the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao

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Curved tiled block in the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao

The commentary then invites you to go out on to the balcony and you are greeted with a burst of colour from Jeff Koons’ Tulips. These large, stainless steel, shining “flowers” are not only visually delightful (to my eye) but they reflect the curves of the museum building itself, meaning that where they are placed is as important as what they are, as the photos show.

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Jeff Koons’ “Tulips” at the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao

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tall Tree and The Jeff Koons’ “Tulips” at the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao

Two other external sculptures are equally eye-catching. The first is Anish Kapoor’s Tall Tree and the Eye which consists of 73 reflective balls which rise to form a tree-like shape. When you look at this sculpture from different angles, you see the building and the surrounding area reflected in the individual balls and each ball reflects its neighbour. This mathematically designed object is both craft and art.

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Anish Kapoor’s “Tall Tree and the Eye” at the Bilbao Guggenheim Museum

The second sculpture, which you see as you approach the museum from the river side, is Louise Bourgeois’ Maman. This looks like a huge spider and is dedicated to the artist’s mother who was a weaver. It’s a fascinating construction and you can walk under it and between the spider’s legs. You see the spider close up on your approach to the museum and then from the museum’s balcony. Each time you look, it seems to be slightly different. The spider is both monstrous and protective of the eggs in the middle but it is also very elegant.

The final external work of art is the monumental Puppy, also a creation of Jeff Koons. This is a huge sculpture in the shape of a puppy – I think that it looks more like a cat – with the outside covered in flowers which are bedding plants and presumably change with the seasons. It’s an amazing sight but also a very attractive one.

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Jeff Koons’ “Puppy” outside the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao

 

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Jeff Koons’ “Puppy” outside the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao

I’ll cover what exhibitions we visited in the next blog post but as you can see from the photos, the Guggenheim Museum is a unique piece of modern art and sculpture. The museum is a modern (if non-religious) cathedral and just as people hundreds of years ago were agog at the construction of the world’s many cathedrals, so the people of Bilbao must have looked on in awe as this superb edifice rose from the side of the river. It is by a country mile the most impressive museum we’ve ever been to.

Barcelona: Football, Gaudi, Maritime Museum; and October poem

October 12, 2013

I had a great trip to Barcelona, that fine European city, with its long straight main streets set out in a grid, and its myriad back streets, with the buildings so close together that people could almost shake hands with their neighbours across their balconies. These balconies are a ubiquitous feature of the city (see Photos 1 and 2 – taken with a small camera, so not the usual quality) and there are many different shapes and designs. It’s a city for walking around and taking a turn off the main streets as often as you can. How else will you find a hammock shop?

The main purpose of the visit was for my pal Roger and me to see the famous FC Barcelona play football (aka soccer) in the amazing Nou Camp Stadium. This is a once in a lifetime experience for most people, so it is worth spending a fair bit of money to get a good seat. When you first go into the stadium – which holds 95,000 people when full – you are amazed by its size and brightness. The game we saw did not start until 10pm, and this is another new experience, certainly for people in the UK and many other countries. We were not disappointed as we saw some of the best players in the world now – Neymar, Fabregas, Pedro and Tello – and some of the best players of all time – Xavi and Iniesta. Unfortunately, the world’s best and best known footballer, Lionel Messi, was injured, and did not play.The level of skill and the movement of the players was way beyond the level which Roger and I see when watching our own team Hibernian FC, aka The HIbs or The Hibees but it was also much better than any football to be witnessed in the UK or in most of Europe. All in all, a unique and unforgettable experience, especially as we had seats very close to the pitch.

I’m sure that for many, many people, the main reason for visiting Barcelona is to see the various buildings and structures designed by Antoni Gaudi. The first visit was to the Palau Guell (see Photo 3 for the exterior) which is a good introduction to Gaudi’s extravagant designs and it has a magnificent interior. The largest and most famous of Gaudi’s work is the still to be completed Sagrida Familia. This amazingly complex building was started in 1882 and is expected to be finished in the next 20 years. It is like something that you have never seen before. The outside of the building has, in some respects, the shapes and structures of other cathedrals but when you look at some of the spires, you see Gaudi’s unusual designs. (See photos 4-6). It is a very good idea to book online if you are visiting as there are extremely long queues throughout the year. Gaudi’s cathedral is not to everyone’s taste and you have to decide for yourself  whether you like aspects of the architecture. Another of Gaudi’s sites which is very worth while visiting is the Cascada situated in the extensive Ciutadella Park. Here you see another example of Gaudi’s extravagant mind with a waterfall running down the front of an ornately decorated building – it’s a stunning sight.

We also visited the Maritime Museum. Unfortunately, my wee camera gave up the ghost at this point, so photos, but the website shows the truly magnificent galley ship which was rowed – mainly by slaves. One interesting feature is that you can see inside the bottom of the ship where sailors worked in very cramped conditions. If you were going back in time to this ship, you’d want to be an officer. It has a very ornate bow and stern. You can also get an excellent 3 course lunch, including a beer or wine, for 10 Euros – great value.

So, back from 23-25 degrees in Barcelona to 10 degrees (feels like 7) and a stiff northerly wind in Dunbar. I turned my poetry calendar to Thursday 10 October and found a poem entitled “October” by X.J. Kennedy. Around here, many of the trees are turning to their autumnal colours. The poem begins “Flat-tired, the years sets out roadside flares” and later “Trees’ signals od distress/Turn more flamboyantly demonstrative”. Impressive imagery.

Barcelona balconies

Barcelona balconies

Barcelona balconies

Barcelona balconies

Palau Güell

Palau Güell

La Sagrida Familia

La Sagrida Familia

La Sagrida Familia

La Sagrida Familia

La Sagrida Familia

La Sagrida Familia