Posts Tagged ‘cycling’

Back on my bike, John Clare podcast and crocuses

February 23, 2017

I had my first cycle on Saturday after being off the bike for 5.5 weeks with very painful sciatica i.e. intermittently, you get a sharp pain in your side and shooting pains going down your leg – and this can happen during the day or night. Okay, it’s a fairly minor complaint but it’s very annoying and frustrating, particularly with the knowledge that cycling will make it worse. When you look up sciatica on the web, the first thing your told by all the websites I looked at is: There is no cure for sciatica. You just have to wait until it calms down and do warm up and warm down exercises before cycling. So, on the bike – tentatively. When you come back to cycling, especially when you get older, there is a change in the environment. What used to be inclines are back to hills, and what used to be small hills are now biggish hills and as for the big hills – forget about them for a while. However, I know that after a few longer cycle rides, the inclines will return to their former status, as will the little hills and the big hills can be conquered – maybe at a painfully slow rate at first.

On Saturday’s bike ride and on today’s, it was refreshing to be out looking at the countryside again, passing clumps of snowdrops now at their peak and also emergent crocus and the odd daffodil in flower. Plus, many of the fields are going green again, while others, newly ploughed, have a sheen on the turned earth which the sun catches. So it was appropriate today that, while on the bike, I listened (safely, able to hear traffic behind me) to a podcast from Melvyn Bragg’s educative and informative series In Our Time on Radio 4. This podcast ( you can listen from anywhere in the world) was on the poet John Clare  and there was a fascinating discussion by three academic experts on Clare’s childhood. He was brought up in relative poverty in the village of Helpston in Northamptonshire, where his father worked on a local farm. Clare left school at 11 and was introduced to poetry by fellow farm labourer, who showed Clare a book of poems about landscape. Clare was published in his 20s and was marketed as a poor farm labourer (a la Robert Burns in Scotland) with a gift for poetry. The podcast reveals how Clare became a poet of the countryside – from the countryside’s and its animals’ point of view i.e. Clare on his walks delved into elements such as the Nightingale’s Nest. As one of the panel observed, Clare did not observe the rural landscape “from over a 5-barred gate” as other rural poets did, but included details – such as the composition of the nightingale’s nest. Clare’s fame did not last and he ended up in a lunatic asylum, but he still wrote poems which have endured until today, later in his life. Clare’s style fell out of fashion but there has been a revival of interest in Clare by poets such as Seamus Heaney and Tom Paulin, who admired Clare’s use of local dialect words. I would recommend this podcast to everyone, not just those interested in poetry.

We are two-thirds of the way through February and the crocus flowers have added a welcome splash of early Spring colour across the UK. Here in Dunbar, the local council have planted hundreds of crocus around the town. The photos that follow are from the council-planted crop just up the road from my house. It was very windy when I took the photos but the sun was out and the crocus glittered and swayed in the wind, which is not cold today. Tomorrow, however, the temperatures are to plummet and we may get gales and snow, which means a battering  for these attractive but flimsy flowers. In this photo, I like the combination of colours, yellow, purple and different shades of green.

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Crocus on Spott Road, Dunbar

In the next photo, a close-up (difficult to do in the wind), the crocus appear to be reaching up to the sun and opening their flowers to ingest the sun’s rays.

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Close up of crocus on Spott Road, Dunbar

In the final photo, which includes both yellow and purple flowers, the crocus are like open-mouthed choir boys, singing at the top of their voices.

Crocus on Spott Road, Dunbar

Crocus on Spott Road, Dunbar

John Clare refers to the crocus in some of his poems, such as this from Early Spring “The Spring is come, and Spring flowers coming too, The crocus, patty kay, the rich hearts’ ease;”. The patty kay is the hepatica flower and the photo below is included under the Creative Commons licence.

Hepatica flower

Hepatica flower

 

 

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Winter cycling and broccoli and Stilton soup

March 5, 2016

It occurred to me the other day that I had not mentioned cycling for quite a while on this blog. In the winter, while the mileage goes down, the regular bike rides on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday still take place. Winter cycling is obviously very similar to summer cycling insofar as I go on similar routes, but there are differences. The first difference is in clothing. In the summer, I put on my cycling top, shorts and shoes and off I go. In the winter, I have 3 thicker, but breathable tops and my winter jacket. I also have a skullcap to protect my ears and a snood for my neck. This means that it takes me longer just to get going. It also means that you have extra weight on the bike AND because it’s so cold, you use up much more energy, so you need to extend more effort to go the same distance as in the summer. My pals and I also go on our mountain bikes more in the winter and it’s very enjoyable, as you get off the road and face the challenges of rocky tracks, mud and ice at times. One of our routes when there’s an east wind is out past the Whitesands beach and on to Barns Ness Lighthouse.(good photos). On our last ride there, the track next to the beach was flooded, so we cycled along the beach itself. It’s OK on hard sand but you have to get off now and then when you hit soft sand or slippery rocks.

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Whitesands Beach near Dunbar

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Barns Ness Lighthouse

On Saturday, I went through part of the Dunglass Estate and on towards the village of Oldhamstocks. This is a good cycling route for mountain bikes (good photos). At one point, I was at the top of a hill, going along tractor tracks in a grassy field and I approached a flock of sheep about 50 yards from me. They stared intently, then one or two stirred and as I got nearer, as one they ran about 20 yards down the hill, turned and stared at me again. What came to my mind was the sheep in Far from the Madding Crowd, Thomas Hardy’s wonderful novel and also a well known film from the 1960s (video trailer) and more recently. Did my sheep wonder why Gabriel Oak from the novel was on a bike? It was a beautiful morning, with the  sun coming through the clouds and in the next field below, a tractor was ploughing, followed by a flock of feasting seagulls. This reminds me that I must buy a video camera for my bike – I’ve been meaning to do this for years.

To misquote an old adage, of the making of soup there is no end. I thought I’d try something different this week and it was the leftover broccoli in the fridge that reminded me that I’d never made broccoli and Stilton soup, something I’ve enjoyed in restaurants over the years. So, on to a well-known search engine and after a browse of different recipes, I settled on the BBC Good Food recipe as it had a variety of ingredients and was healthier than others e.g. the ones suggesting double cream. It’s easy to make. I sweated a finely chopped large onion, a celery stick and a medium sized leek and added a teaspoonful dried mixed herbs, then added a chopped (and soaked) large potato. I stirred this around for a minute and then added 2 heads of roughly chopped broccoli. I added a litre of stock – ham stock cubes for me but you choose your stock – and let it simmer for about 25 minutes, until the potato was soft. I then mashed it down with my potato masher and used my hand held blender to make it smooth. The recipe suggests 140g of Stilton cheese but when I measured this out, it was too much cheese. I added 85g of the cheese and this turned out to be to our satisfaction as the cheese does not over power the broccoli flavour. We had the soup today with a lovely loaf from Bostock Bakery in North Berwick.

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Bostock Bakery loaf

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Broccoli and Stilton soup with fresh bread

While the soup looks (and was) very tasty, any good chef would have told me to properly clean the plate before serving.

 

Tour of Britain, The McManus and Verdant Works

September 18, 2015

Last week, the Tour of Britain cycle race passed through East Lothian as part of Stage 4. My two cycling pals and I had hoped to cycle up to Redstone Rig (video), a high point in the Lammermuir Hills, where points were being awarded for the King of the Mountains contest, but one was injured, so we went by car. On a sunny day i.e. the day before and the day after, there are spectacular views across the hills and out to the North Sea from Redstone Rig but on the day of the race, it was dull and a cold east wind meant that spectators had to be well rugged up. We could see the riders approach from the west, as police motor cars and motor cycles sped up the hill past us.

Tour of Britain 2015

Tour of Britain 2015

The leading group passed up, followed by the main peloton soon afterwards. As amateur cyclists, we were glad to see that even some of the professionals were finding the Rig a difficult proposition although their speed was still much faster than ours. Getting up Redstone Rig is an achievement in itself for me – it’s a bit easier for my two much fitter pals. It was a lively occasion with many local cyclists in the crowd and it was a real treat to see the race so close up and, because of the steep climb, at a slower speed. After the peloton, the team cars came by with spare bikes on the top and we amateurs looked on enviously at these superb – and very costly – bikes.

Peloton at Redstone Rig in the Tour of Britain

Peloton at Redstone Rig in the Tour of Britain

Team cars at the Tour of Britain

Team cars at the Tour of Britain

We spent a couple of days in the town of Carnoustie (good photos) with a very good offer at the Carnoustie Golf Hotel. On the firs afternoon, we had a very pleasant walk around Monikie (pr Mon-ee-ki) Country Park. The sun came out and the clouds reflected in the water, as in the photo below, taken on my phone.

Monikie Country Park

Monikie Country Park

The following day was a complete contrast with constant rain and a cool easterly breeze. We set off by train to Dundee (good photos), the historic city by the River Tay. We went to the tourist information service in the city square and a very helpful young man told us what we should visit. The tourist office is next to the magnificent Caird Hall which even on a wet day – photo below – looked impressive.

Caird Hall, Dundee

Caird Hall, Dundee

Our first visit was to the equally grand McManus galleries and museum which has a range of galleries which relate to the history of Dundee as well as contemporary and historic art. We focused on the Victoria gallery. Two paintings particularly caught our eye. The first was John Lavery’s depiction of a hospital ward at the start of World War One, entitled The First Wounded. There are many stories in this painting. At the forefront a nurse in a formal, starched uniform is tending to a soldier’s arm, while in the bed behind, another soldier with a head wound looks in pain. Next to the bed, a man casually reads the paper and smokes a pipe. Today of course, you would not see smoking inside a hospital and indeed you rarely see a man smoking a pipe any more. In the background, a one legged soldier on crutches makes his way down the ward while another soldier, perhaps also having lost a leg is in a wheelchair. The painting superbly contrasts the calm, cleanliness and brightness (the sun reflecting the windows on the floor) of the ward with what must have been the chaos, dirt and dreariness of the battlefield.

The First Wounded by John Lavery

The First Wounded by John Lavery

The second painting was The Blackbird Song by Edward Hornel. This is a much different and more romantic topic and painting, with the three young girls listening to the blackbird and surrounded by flowers and trees. The detail is magnificently drawn and there is a dreamlike quality to the painting, an image of innocence and perfection.

The Blackbird Song by Edward Hornel

The Blackbird Song by Edward Hornel

After lunch, we walked – still with umbrellas up – to the Verdant Works a museum telling the history of the jute industry in Dundee. This is a fascinating visit with a helpful guide at the start and then a tour of the museum which features photos of jute plantations in India. I have to admit that I had always thought that jute was a material, but it is a plant which grows to about ten feet tall in India/Bangladesh and the fibres are processed to make sacking, ropes and carpets. The jute industry employed thousands of people – men, women and children – in horrendous conditions in the 19th century when the process was mechanised and huge factories were built. For the owners this was very profitable but for the workers it meant hard work, no health and safety and short life spans. Some good images of the machines can be seen here – the harsh lighting made it difficult to take photos in the museum.

The Beautiful Librarians, Le Tour ends and sweet peas

July 28, 2015

I’ve just finished reading The Poetry Book Society’s Choice –  The Beautiful Librarians by Sean O’Brien a professor at Newcastle University and well established British poet. For me, an educator of librarians in universities in Scotland and Australia for 34 years, the title was alluring, of course. As a member of the Poetry Book Society, I get sent 4 books a year – not chosen by me. O’Brien’s book is a mixture of what might be nostalgia and class consciousness “Scattered comrades now remember: someone stole the staffroom tin/ Where we collected for the miners, for the strike they couldn’t win”  and comic interludes such as in Old Lads at the Ramshill Hotel “.. these wobbly suitors with their grease-grey quiffs/ And suits that are older than they are”. The title poem, superbly analysed by Carol Rumens is also a nostalgic look back to when O’Brien was a student. The poem begins “The beautiful librarians are dead,/ The fairly recent graduates who sat/ Like Françoise Hardy’s shampooed sisters/ With cardigans across their shoulders/ On quiet evenings at the issue desk,/Stamping books and never looking up/ At where I stood in adoration”. The reference to Francoise Hardy is very meaningful to me because, as a teenager, I was lovestruck by Ms Hardy’s stunning looks and vertigo inducing French voice, such as in the song All Over the World. Some of the poems in this collection appeared to be very clever but lacked depth, while others were superb – try it for yourself.

The Beautiful Librarians by Sean O'Brien

The Beautiful Librarians by Sean O’Brien

So, another Tour de France has come to an end. Three weeks of aching ascents and death-defying descents has thrilled millions of people across the globe and not just cycling enthusiasts. My cycling pal John maintains that even watching the cyclists go up some the high climbs such as La Croix de Fer (video) makes his legs feel sore. It was great to have a British winner again in Chris Froome and there were many exciting finishes. I’ve been wearing my Guardian cycling T Shirts recently but I was surprised – and shocked – at so many people not knowing what the third word in the slogan (photo below) originally was. As ever, I’ve promised my self that I’ll do more hills from now on, inspired by the teams on Le Tour. I would advise you to watch this space, but …..

Le Tour de France T shirt

Le Tour de France T shirt

My wife’s running partner brought us a beautiful bunch of sweet peas freshly cut from her garden. These flowers not only have soft but attractive colours but they also have a lovely perfume. These delicate flowers do not last very long but make a lasting impression as in the photos below, and some of the pinks were replicated in a rose I saw in a garden only yesterday.

Jar of sweet peas

Jar of sweet peas

Sweet peas close up

Sweet peas close up

Rose with burgeoning buds

Rose with burgeoning buds

Weekly Photo Challenge – Yellow

December 23, 2014

A colourful topic this week – see more on Sue’s website and see my selection below.

Wallflower with raindrops

Wallflower with raindrops

Yellow stripe on fish in Dubai Aquarium

Yellow stripe on fish in Dubai Aquarium

Bumble bee in my garden

Bumble bee in my garden

London Olympics - Australian cyclist

London Olympics – Australian cyclist

Oilseed rape field at St Abb's Head

Oilseed rape field at St Abb’s Head

1950 Whales, cycling and the Assassination of Margaret Thatcher

September 24, 2014

One of the most striking events that I’ve uncovered in my local history research project on Dunbar in 1950 is the beaching and death of 147 whales at Thorntonloch, near Dunbar. The whales were discovered by two local boys who could see a few whales on the beach but many more in the water. There was an attempt to put some of the whale calves out to sea, but they immediately swam back to their parents. The whales attracted huge crowds and it was estimated that around 33,000 people came to the site. This is a remarkable figure, given that very few people in 1950 had cars. The local paper The Haddingtonshire Courier (now the East Lothian Courier) reported that “hundreds of vehicles, including specially chartered buses” arrived at the scene and people had to walk 2 miles in some cases to see the whales. The photo below – from the Illustrated London News of 1950 – shows the whales and the onlookers. As part of my research, I’m going to be interviewing people who went to see the whales.

Stranded whales at Thorntonloch, near Dunbar, in 1950

Stranded whales at Thorntonloch, near Dunbar, in 1950

We’ve had a great summer here in Dunbar and we’re now into an Indian summer, a term which  has its origins in North America, where the native Americans needed warm and settled weather in September in order to get their crops in. The fine weather has meant that I’ve been able to do quite a lot of cycling. This week’s cycles around the East Lothian countryside have seen me accompanied overhead by huge skeins of pink footed geese, heading for Aberlady Nature Reserve. The extended V shapes in the sky are a great sight and you can hear some of the geese calling out. These calls are to keep the younger geese in line and to prevent them from getting separated from the main group. The countryside itself is changing. The harvest is over and the ploughs are back in the fields, turning the fields from the post-harvest yellow to shiny brown. The poet A E Houseman features ploughs in his poems, including Is my team ploughing? which opens with “Is my team ploughing,/ That I was used to drive/ And hear the harness jingle/ When I was man alive?”/ Ay, the horses trample,/ The harness jingles now;/ No change though you lie under/ The land you used to plough”. Horse ploughing in small fields is no more and today’s satnav enabled tractors with their shiny, flashing blades ease across the fields, leaving a glistening brown wake behind them.

Hilary Mantel, the author of the excellent Thomas Cromwell centred novels Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies has a new collection of short stories out, under the arresting title of The Assassination of Margaret Thatcher. The title story was published in full in The Guardian at the weekend and an intriguing read it is. A woman in a flat near a hospital where Mrs Thatcher is being treated answers her door, expecting the plumber and lets the man in as he might be the plumber’s son. The man turns out to be an IRA assassin. I’ll let you read the story yourself via the link, and decide for yourself whether this is up to the high standards set in the two Cromwell novels.

Blazin’ Fiddles, Borders cycle and sunlight on rocks and bridge

September 6, 2014

On Sunday, we went to Haddington (11 miles/18K from Dunbar) to see the final act of the Trad on the Tyne Festival – the very lively Blazin’ Fiddles. This is a 6 member group, led by Bruce MacGregor, who hosts the excellent Travelling Folk radio show (available worldwide, so check it out). In the group, there are 4 fiddle players, one guitarist and one keyboard player. The show is a mix of fast and furious group fiddle playing and individual cameos by the fiddle players. One of the outstanding individual sets was a a very melodic slow air played by Jenna Reid. The band have a well rehearsed set of often humorous introduction to their sets of tunes and they do appear to enjoy playing with such gusto, especially at the end of the show, with a few rousing tunes to send the audience home happy. It was very enjoyable to sit in the tent on a warm summer evening and be entertained by a set of lively and highly talented musicians.

Yesterday, Val and I ventured down to the borders with my cycling pal Alistair and his wife Di. We drove to the tiny village of Heriot, unloaded the bikes from the rack and set off on a very pleasant, quiet, rural route to Innerleithen, down a long 4 mile descent, following the Leithen Water. This attractive wee town is most famous for Robert Smail’s Printing Works which is a National Trust property now but was once a prosperous business in the town. The Smail Archive  contains many examples of the variety of publications produced at the works and much of the machinery survives and is well maintained. This is well worth a visit if you are in the area. We had coffee/tea and scones at the excellent Whistle Stop Café (good photo). We were given a friendly welcome and were even given locks for our bikes. The café has attached rings to the outside wall on to which cyclists can lock their bikes – what a service!. From there, the route took us to Clovenfords where we had lunch, having cycled 22 miles (36K). Thereafter, there was a 15.5 mile (25K) cycle which took in some stiffish hills but also exhilarating downhill freewheeling. At one point, we passed through the extensive Bowland Estate and to our right, for about 10 miles, we could see the construction of the new Borders Railway which will go from Edinburgh to Tweedbank.  So, a great day out and a lovely part of the country – must go back and take my camera with me.

Two recent walks with my camera were on sunlit evenings and I captured some different effects of the late sunlight. Firstly, a walk along the promenade at the back of our house. When the tide recedes, there is revealed a series of rocks of different shapes and some appear to be landscapes in miniature e.g. ragged mountain ranges. If you can catch the sun on these rocks at the right time, there are some wonderful colours, as in the 3 photos below (click to enlarge).

Sunlight on the rocks off Dunbar's east promenade

Sunlight on the rocks off Dunbar’s east promenade

Sunlight on the rocks off Dunbar's east promenade

Sunlight on the rocks off Dunbar’s east promenade

Sunlight on the rocks off Dunbar's east promenade

Sunlight on the rocks off Dunbar’s east promenade

The second walk went past Belhaven Bridge – featured before on this blog. There was a biggish sun on the horizon which brought out the bridge’s structure well and the sun reddened the shallow water under the bridge.

Belhaven Bridge at sunset

Belhaven Bridge at sunset

Belhaven Bridge at sunset

Belhaven Bridge at sunset

 

 

 

Stoical cycling, strawberries and post-rain flowers

July 7, 2014

In a Guardian article on Stoicism, the writer states that stoicism “brings about three specific qualities: the life of good flow; freedom from negative emotions; and beauty of soul. In contrast to all the aforementioned stereotypes, then, stoicism aims for human flourishing in a very full sense, and an ability to find ways through times of crisis”. For cyclists, stoicism is very apt. You need a “good flow” when on the bike e.g. a steady rhythm, whether on the flat or going up a hill. You certainly need to avoid “negative emotions” although this is very hard – sometimes you can convince yourself that a slight tiredness is an all encompassing fatigue or that slight pain in your leg is an oncoming thrombosis. The “beauty of soul” of course, is getting to the summit of a big hill and freewheeling down the other side. cyclists have  many “times of crisis” – in their heads mainly – and many would doubt the use of crisis in these situations. I needed my stoicism this week.  I was getting back on my bike, after having a drink half way through a fairly hilly route. I put my shoe into my right cleat, pushed forward to go off but I was in too high a gear. There was a moment of stillness and motionless and then my hip whacked the tarmac i.e. instead hitting the road, I hit the road. I now sport a bruise, the colours of which would not be out of place in a painting depicting dark purplish, rain-filled clouds. Stoicism finds a way.

For the last fortnight, we have been enjoying strawberries from the garden. It’s a very satisfying experience to go out each evening and pick strawberries that you have cultivated yourself. However, it’s easy to over romanticise this and think that gathering in your own produce is a constant pleasure. For people who have had to grown their own food to survive, gathering vegetables or fruit was a daily chore, not a leisure activity. Despite this, there is a definite feeling of achievement – and possible smugness – in bringing in the fruit. Photo 1 shows today’s crop – and, of course, they taste much better than those for which you have paid.

Strawberries from the garden

Strawberries from the garden

Those of you of a certain age will remember The Move’s song Flowers in the Rain but it’s not just the sound of the rain ( you can listen here for 2 hours!) that I like, but the after effects of the rain on flowers in the garden. Like many other would be serious photographers, rain is a promise of close-up photos. Photo 2 shows raindrops on a begonia flower. Begonias are big, showy, in your face, big bright red flowers and some regard them as rather too showy. Photo 3 is of a more gently coloured geranium. Geraniums look more refined than begonias. You might see a begonia returning from a trip to Spain with a kiss-me-quick hat on, but a geranium would be in business class, with a smart outfit. Photo 4 shows raindrops on the leaves of not yet flowed cornflower. There’s an abstract quality here – can you see a serpent’s tongue?

Begonias after the rain

Begonias after the rain

Geranium after the rain

Geranium after the rain

Rain on cornflour

Rain on cornflower

 

 

Seal poem, (s)old bike and Clive James interview

January 18, 2014

In my poetry calendar on Wednesday, was John Fuller’s Seal at Carreg Ddu. It compares the look of the seal on the rocks “like a half blown balloon” and the female seal “waddles to the waves,/Kilos of whiskered blubber”. The final verse is even more precisely descriptive and animated: “But look! Once in the water/Like a bullet she is free,/All muscle, all shoulders/Tunnelling through the sea. Fuller’s use of the word tunnelling makes this, for me, a great poem. In one word, he creates a video for the reader – of the seal arrowing through the water. If the seal was a huge earth moving rotator, it would be a speeded up form, creating a tunnel in seconds, instead of months. Carreg Ddu is an island off the coast of Wales. My poetry calendar ran from 2011 t0 2013 but I still turn the page every day. I might have a go at creating my own online poetry calendar – watch this space. Photo 1 has appeared on the blog before but it’s worth including again.

Seal in Dunbar Harbour

Seal in Dunbar Harbour

 

My cycling mate John, who has five bikes in his sheds, is a strong advocate of not selling your present bike when you buy a new one. Why? Well, just in case… What if … You never know the day… We only have garage space and as of last night, there were my two road bikes, my mountain bike and my wife’s bike. I decided to sell my older road bike. I advertised it on Gumtree and within an hour, I had a query about the bike frame size (you measure the length of the seat tube). I replied and got another email asking if James (from Dunfermline) could come to  see the bike. He arrived at 8.30pm and bought the bike. He even sent me a text today, saying that he had just completed his first proper bike ride on the Giant OCR and he thought it was brilliant. How good was that? Here is what James bought for (an absolute snip at) £150.

My old Giant OCR bike

My old Giant OCR bike

 

Out on my new bike earlier in the week, I listened to a download of Start the Week   – a Monday morning radio programme, in which there is usually a panel of people discussing a topic (e.g. nationality, culture, history etc). I’d missed the programme over the festive period but was delighted to see that, when I scrolled down the episodes, there was a whole show devoted to an interview with Clive James.   This writer – of prose, poetry and journalism – and broadcaster on TV and radio, has been a favourite of mine over four decades. I first started reading him when he was the TV critic of The Observer a UK Sunday newspaper. Some of his funniest articles were on the US TV series Dallas, about rich oil men and their shenanigans with oil and with other people’s wives. James’ keen ear for dialogue and pronunciation was brilliantly illustrated in the article Someone shart JR . In the article, Sue Ellen keeps her gern in a drawer and James ended the section by writing “Don’t be surprised if the sheriff turns up with a wornt for her arrest. There could be a tornt of wornts. ” He is also a very accomplished poet, so check out the radio programme and make an extended visit to the Clive James website.

 

A Word a Week photo challenge: Yellow

January 9, 2014

Here are my photos for this week’s theme. See lots more at Sue’s website.

Olympic cyclist in London

Olympic cyclist in London

Team car - Tour of Britain, Jedburgh

Team car – Tour of Britain, Jedburgh

Courgette/zucchini flower

Courgette/zucchini flower

Brazier - Tauranga, NZ

Brazier – Tauranga, NZ

Pansy after the rain

Pansy after the rain