Posts Tagged ‘Dunbar castle’

Back to St Abbs and Spring flowers (2)

March 26, 2017

On Sunday, another visit to one of our favourite places, St Abbs Head (good photos), featured many times on this blog. It’s a small village but you can vary your walks and views nearby and always see something just a bit different from the last time. We parked at the National Trust car park and walked down past the farm on our left, which had a shed full of sheep just about to lamb. We saw some lambs in a nearby field and I managed to capture them amongst some shapely reflections of the trees.

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Lambs at St Abbs (Click to enlarge)

We went up the first part of the cliff top walk – going west to east – but only wanted a short walk, so we didn’t go any further. On the way back, you look across the to village of St Abbs Head, past the ragged shaped outcrop of rock (Photo below). It made me wonder whether, in a hundred or two hundred years, that rock column, sculpted by the weather, will still be there. It’s a superb view, taking in the harbour and all the houses built on the once empty cliffs above. There was only a gentle swell on the sea that day, with the waves edging slowly around the rocks, and not crashing over them as they often do.

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Rock column and St Abbs Head village

The next photo is from an angle I don’t think I’ve taken a shot from before. It is looking back across the edge of the harbour towards the clifftop walk, with the impressive Northfield House prominent on the cliff. The rock column in the photo above is just to the top right of this photo. Behind the house on the left with the red roof, with chimneys at either end (like the house to its right), there is a wooden staircase which leads you up to the impressive St Abbs Visitor Centre, which is well worth a visit.

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View across St Abbs Head arbour to the cliff walk

We walked back to the car park and, at the end of the farm buildings, I came across a trailer load of neeps – see photo below. In Scotland, we call them neeps or turnips. In England, they are called Swedes. What people in other parts of Britain call turnips, which are much smaller than neeps, we call white turnips. Around Dunbar, you will also hear people referring to Tumshies, another name for neeps/Swedes/turnips. Very confusing? For your amusement, but maybe not illumination, read this excellent Guardian article on the subject.

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A trailer load of neeps at St Abbs Head.

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Close up of neeps at St Abbs Head

And so to the second reflection on Spring flowers. In many towns in Scotland, councils in recent years have greatly expanded the planting of Spring flowers and it is not unusual to see great swathes of bright yellow and white crocuses at the entrance to these towns. Councils also planted thousand of daffodils and it is they which now take centre stage, as the crocuses have faded. There is something uplifting about seeing large groups of daffodils and I think Wordsworth had something to say on the topic in two versions (see website). I took a photo of daffodils on a banking at The Glebe in Dunbar. This small park overlooks the sea and the harbour entrance. The photo looks towards the remains of Dunbar Castle(good photos).

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Daffodils on a banking The Glebe, Dunbar

My aim every year is to take very clear close-up photos of flowers, to get to the heart of them and look at them as abstract shapes as well as attractive flowers. In the first photo below, I took two contrasting daffodils, one with white petals and one with yellow petals. They are both enchanting flowers but maybe the white petals emphasise the yellow, choir boys’ ruff of the flower’s centre more. Both have delicate stigma which thrust out to attract the pollen seekers. They are like mini corn on the cob with extensions.

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Two daffodils in my garden

In the final photo, I like the delicate folds in the prawn cracker petals and the ragged edge of the flower is similar to the rock face above at St Abbs. Also, the colour in the flower is not uniformly yellow but contains various shades, making it even more attractive.

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Yellow and white daffodil in my garden

 

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Harbour reflections and making Minestrone

December 14, 2016

I took my camera for a walk along to Dunbar Harbour (good photos) last week. The day was so wind free that the water in the harbour hardly moved and the wee boats, which are usually swaying gently to an unheard waltz tune on the accordion, were statuesque. It’s very unusual not to have any kind of wind in Dunbar and at one point, it looked as if the sea had given up coming into the harbour, as the water appeared – very briefly – to be motionless. Then a gentle ripple spread from the entrance to the harbour across to the boats.

The two photos below are taken at the east end of the harbour and the perfect reflection in the 1st photo shows how calm the water became. There’s a hint of movement in the water in the 2nd photo and the wee boat looks isolated. This is because all the small yachts that lie in the harbour in the summer have been removed for safety. I like the way the harbour walls are reflected in the water in the 2nd photo.

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Calm day at Dunbar Harbour

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Calm day at Dunbar Harbour

The next 2 photos are taken at the castle end of the harbour. In the first photo, the reflections look as if they might come from an impressionist painting e.g. the squiggly lines in the castle walls’ reflection. It was a cold day but the colours in the boats and in the fish boxes on the quayside inserted a warm feature into this walker’s experience. In the both photos, the castle ruins still show the white patches left by the nesting kittiwakes, who visited in the summer. The kittiwakes have featured on this blog more than once e.g. here. In the 2nd photo, the wider angle shows the castle ruins and the narrow entrance to the harbour. Another unusual feature of this visit to the harbour was the absence of birds on the water, as you often get small groups of eider duck. On this RSPB site, you can listen to the gurgling, whoo-hooing of the eider duck, and you can usually hear this from the harbourside.

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Fishing boats near Dunbar Castle

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Reflections of the ruins of Dunbar Castle

Having made lentil and vegetable, tomato and lentil, and parsnip and pear soup recently, I thought that it must be the turn of minestrone. The term minestrone comes from the Latin minestra meaning soup with pasta (and/or other ingredients) and one as a suffix meaning large, thus giving us a soup with big vegetables. The soup is mentioned in a cookbook by Apicus (the whole book from Project Gutenberg here) published in 30CE, so it has ancient traditions. You could spend the rest of your life looking at the myriad of minestrone recipes on the web i.e. almost anything goes as long as you have vegetables and pasta in it. Almost all recipes include tomatoes. Today, my minestrone has a large leek, 3 stalks of celery, diced turnip (aka swede) and carrot, dried basil and oregano, a tin of tomatoes, 2 tbs tomatoes puree and a litre of chicken stock. I put a little oil in the bottom of my large soup pan and added the basil and oregano. I then sweated the leeks and celery, and added the turnip and carrot until it looks like this:

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Sweating the vegetables in the making of minestrone

I then added the tomatoes, tomato puree and broken spaghetti, brought it  to the boil and simmered it for c20 minutes. I always find that you should never eat minestrone soup right away – let the flavours develop for at least 8 hours or preferably overnight. You can then have a colourful, tasty and winter warming soup which served up will look something like this photo from last year. Have it for lunch with crusty bread and if you are lucky like me, go for a walk along to the harbour with your camera afterwards.

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A plate of minestrone soup with basil leaves

Dunbar harbour (again) and Abbey St Bathans

August 25, 2015

There’s a biblical saying indicating (roughly) that there is no end to the making of books and there is no end to me taking photographs of my local harbour, which has featured a few times on this blog e.g. here and here. One reason for this is that the light is never exactly the same at Dunbar harbour, the tide is never at exactly the same height and the boats and yachts in the harbour are never exactly in the same place. These most recent photos were taken on a cloudy evening although there was enough light from the west to illuminate the water and enable the reflections to appear. The sounds of the harbour are always changing and the most significant recent change has been a dramatic decrease in sound as the calls of the kittiwakes no longer pierce the evening calm. The birds which nested on the castle walls ( see my photos) since April have gone back out to sea until next year.

Dunbar harbour on a cloudy evening

Dunbar harbour on a cloudy evening

Reflections in Dunbar harbour

Reflections in Dunbar harbour

Creels, yachts and castle ruins at Dunbar Harbour

Creels, yachts and castle ruins at Dunbar Harbour

It’s been a good few years since we ventured to Abbey St Bathans. From Dunbar, this is a pleasant drive – and a hard cycle run because of the many hills encountered. There are some nice walks from where you park near the bridge which is part of the route on the Southern Upland Way, a popular walking route.

Southern Upland Way signpost

Southern Upland Way signpost

The fast flowing Whiteadder (pr Whittader) River flows through this hamlet and there is a swinging bridge upstream which was built by the Gurkas in 1987. The church (good photos) is famous for being built on the site of a 12th century abbey.  Nowadays, there is a trout farm and a restaurant/gallery along the road from the church.  Over the road is an extensive sawmill – an unusual sight in the 21st century – but it gladdens the eye to see the piles of tree trunks sculpturally assembled across the mill yard. There is also always a lovely smell from the drying logs.

Whiteadder River at Abbey St Bathans

Whiteadder River at Abbey St Bathans

Sawmill at Abbey St Bathans

Sawmill at Abbey St Bathans

 

Kittiwakes, wild flowers and salmon en croute

July 21, 2015

I took my camera and zoom lens to Dunbar harbour for my annual attempt to get good shots of the kittiwakes which nest on the walls of the ruins of Dunbar Castle (good photos). Every April, the kittiwakes arrive and the harbour is enlivened with their calls – kitty-wake, kitty wake (click on audio). When the nesting season gets going in full, there can be a cacophony of noise at the harbour as hundreds of birds can be heard yelling out. For visitors to the harbour, there is an opportunity to get close to the birds and the chicks can be clearly seen with the naked eye from the harbourside. From time to time, a group of artists will arrive and sketch the birds. Over the years, I’ve tried to get the best shots I can of adult and chick kittiwakes and last year’s snaps can be seen here. This year’s selection follows. As ever, click to enlarge.

Kittiwake chick at Dunbar castle

Kittiwake chick at Dunbar castle

Kittiwake adult and chick at Dunbar castle

Kittiwake adult and chick at Dunbar castle

Kittiwake adult and chick at Dunbar castle

Kittiwake adult and chick at Dunbar castle

Kittiwake adults and chicks at Dunbar castle

Kittiwake adults and chicks at Dunbar castle

In Dunbar this summer, there are several areas of wildflowers which have brightened up the town and the following photos were taken at Lauderdale Park. The colours provided by the poppies, cornflower and other flowers are a lively mix and a real pleasure for the viewer.

Wildflowers at Lauderdale Park, Dunbar

Wildflowers at Lauderdale Park, Dunbar

Wildflowers at Lauderdale Park, Dunbar

Wildflowers at Lauderdale Park, Dunbar

This week we have, as the Australians say, visiting rellies – so what to cook for the first evening meal? We went for a Jamie Oliver recipe Salmon en Croute as it is different from the standard salmon inside a pastry envelope. In this recipe, I bought some ready to use puff pastry, pre-rolled for convenience and laid it on a tray dusted with flour. I used 4 salmon fillets instead of one large fillet. The JO recipe uses black olive tapenade but as we’re no olive fans, I used a jar of sun-dried tomato pesto and spread a teaspoonful of pesto over each salmon. You then put 3/4 basil leaves on each fillet, followed by sliced tomato and salt and pepper. The final ingredient is mozzarella and I sliced it thinly and put 3 slices on each fillet. To make a pastry case, you fold up the sides of the pastry and pinch each corner to keep it firm. The pastry is brushed with beaten egg and put in a 200 degree oven for 35 minutes. It is very tasty and also looks attractive in the dish and on the plate. Here is my completed dish. So, easy to prepare and it looks more complicated than it is, so your guests will be impressed.

Salmon en croute

Salmon en croute

A Word a Week Photograph Challenge – Companion

November 13, 2014

Here are my photos on the is topic – for many more, see Sue’s website.

Novak Djokovic and companion at Dubai Masters Tennis

Novak Djokovic and companion at Dubai Masters Tennis

Contemplating companions

Contemplating companions

Mother and child kittiwake on Dunbar Castle

Mother and child kittiwake on Dunbar Castle

Companions of elegance

Companions of elegance

Bovine companions at St Abbs Head

Bovine companions at St Abbs Head

Weekly photo challenge – endurance

September 23, 2014

Another word with different meanings for this week’s challenge. Here are mine and see many more suggestions at Sue’s website.

Brad Khalefeldt from Wagga Wagga winning the 2006 Commonwealth gold medal for the triathalon

Brad Khalefeldt from Wagga Wagga winning the 2006 Commonwealth gold medal for the triathlon

Runners on the tough Traprain Law Race

Runners on the tough Traprain Law Race

Horse stoically enduring a very hard frost

Horse stoically enduring a very hard frost

The ruins of Dunbar Castle - 900 years old

The ruins of Dunbar Castle – 900 years old

Evening sun on the Bass Rock - 350 million years old

Evening sun on the Bass Rock – 350 million years old

Robert Greenhalf and kittiwakes on Dunbar Castle

July 15, 2014

A recent visit to the Scottish Ornithologists Club at Waterstone House to see an exhibition by Robert Greenhalf and two other artists. I left a message on all 3 artists’ website and Robert Greenhalf replied and kindly sent me 2 photos of his work. Robert’s work covers woodcuts, watercolours and oils and his portrayal of seabirds particularly caught my eye. In Robert’s paintings, there is a sense of movement as well as delicate colour – see for example, his Feeding Godwits. Photo 1 – Common Terns – has a lovely mixture of blue on the birds and the waves. Photo 2 – one of my personal favourites from the exhibition – Oystercatchers – is a dynamic portrayal of the birds taking off in unison. This type of collective launch can often be seen at the west end of Belhaven Beach in Dunbar, on the other side of town from which I live.

Robert Greenhalf: Common Terns

Robert Greenhalf: Common Terns

Robert Greenhalf: Oystercatchers

Robert Greenhalf: Oystercatchers

Sticking with the sea bird theme, I made my annual 0.5 mile walk along to Dunbar Harbour with my Canon 1000D camera and my Tamron AF70 lens, which I use for close up photography at a larger distance than I can get on my “normal ” lens. Each year, I go along specifically to photograph the kittiwake chicks on the walls of Dunbar Castle. The kittiwakes are small gulls which return to the nesting site each year, although at Dunbar Castle, it is noticeable that numbers are declining, and this is attributed to the shortage of their main food, sand eels. Over the years, I’ve tried to capture the perfect Kittiwake Madonna and child(ren) photo – so I’ll keep trying. Kittiwakes are intermittently very noisy birds and one bird returning to a nest and giving a welcoming cry (supposed to sound like Kit – ti – wake) can start off a collective, high-pitched  yelling. Photos 3, 4 and 5 show the mothers (I think) and chicks in various poses. In fact, in Photo 3, the birds seemed to have posed for a family shot.

Kittiwake family

Kittiwake family

In photo 4, both parent and chick look determined to remain straight-faced, while in Photo 5, the parent attends to the chick’s needs.

Kittiwake family

Kittiwake family

Kittiwake family

Kittiwake family

Photo 6 shows how the kittiwakes live cheek by jowl in the nesting site on the castle wall. the red sandstone of the walls provides a colourful and wind-blown background to the nests.

Kittiwake nests on Dunbar Castle

Kittiwake nests on Dunbar Castle

A Word a Week Photo Challenge: Waiting

January 16, 2014

Here are photos for this week’s challenge – see Sue’s website for many more.

Waiting for a fleece

Waiting for a fleece

My mate Charlie Moses at his farm in Coolamon, NSW and his sheep shearing son

Waiting to be released back into the wild

Waiting to be released back into the wild

The Snake Man releasing a brown snake (very dangerous) at Pomingalarna Reserve, near Wagga Wagga. People in Wagga Wagga phone the Snake Man if they find a snake in or near their house.

Waiting for fish

Waiting for fish

A heron in the sea at the back of my house in Dunbar

Waiting for food

Waiting for food

A hungry kittiwake chick on its nest on the walls of Dunbar Castle

Waiting for customers

Waiting for customers

Thai food stall in a Dubai hotel

 

Weekly photo challenge – Castle

August 1, 2013

Here are my suggestions for this week’s challenge. See Sue’s website for much, much more.

Ruins of Dunbar Castle behind Dunbar harbour

Ruins of Dunbar Castle behind Dunbar harbour

I live in Dunbar and the harbour is about 0.5 miles from my home. The castle used to be one of the strongest in Scotland.

Huntly Castle

Huntly Castle

Huntly Castle is in the north of Scotland and still an impressive sight.

Alnwick Castle

Alnwick Castle

Alnwick Castle is in the north east of England, not far from the Scottish border. A former stronghold, it was recently in the news as part of the Harry Potter films were shot there.

Kittiwakes nesting on the walls of Dunbar Castle

Kittiwakes nesting on the walls of Dunbar Castle

The kittiwakes arrive in early summer and hundreds nest on the walls of the castle ruins.