Posts Tagged ‘flowers’

Winter Flowers exhibition and Word of Mouth

March 17, 2018

On a recent visit to Edinburgh, I stopped at the National Gallery at the bottom of The Mound, to visit the Winter Flowers exhibition, which is organised by The Royal Scottish Academy. This is an impressive and varied display of current and past artists who have approached the depiction of winter flowers and woods in a fascinating variety of ways – watercolour, oil, woodcut and lithograph. The first picture below is a collagraph by the Scottish Artist Frances Walker. Using the collagraph technique, the artist gives the impression that this print may in fact be a collage when you first look at it. What attracted my eye in particular was the use of colour in the water in the painting, as it contrasts with the black/grey and white of the rest of the print. You really get the feeling of winter when looking at this print, which gives the impression that this scene, while beautiful to look at, is not somewhere you’d want to venture. When I was looking at this print, outside the gallery there were regular snow flurries sweeping along Princes Street.

RSA 1 Frances Walker RSA, Winter in Achnasoul Wood 2, hand tinted collograph o...

Winter in Achnasaul Wood by Frances Walker (Click on all photos to enlarge)

The second choice from the exhibition is Elizabeth Blackadder’s stunning watercolour entitled Orchids and Bananas. Unlike the print above, it’s not quite clear why Blackadder’s 1989 painting should be in an exhibition of winter flowers. No-one was quibbling when they came upon this work. It’s quite a large painting – 69cm x 102cm – and what you first notice is that the leaves, flowers and stems are portrayed horizontally. Maybe the artist wants us to look at the various flower parts as shapes, rather than actual greenery and flower heads? There’s a real delicacy in this painting, with each stem, leaf or flower perfectly portrayed. There also appeared to be movement win the painting when I continued to look at it, as if the constituent parts were flying past in a storm, and the artist had caught them in a snapshot. The orchid flower heads at the top right are so faintly painted that you hardly see them at first, but the closer you look, the more beautiful they become. This was for me the standout painting in the exhibition.

 

RSA1 Elizabeth Blackadder RSA, Orchids and Bananas, watercolour, 1989 69 x 10...

Orchids and bananas by Elizabeth Blackadder

Orchids and bananas by Elizabeth Blackadder

The final choice from the exhibition is Honey by Ade Adesina. The artist states that he sees his work as ” a visual commentary around the ideas of ecology and our ever-changing world” and how humans are affecting the planet in a deleterious way. This linocut is very unusual, beautifully constructed, visually intriguing, but also very hard to categorise. I’m not sure that I understand what the print represents. What is the panda pulling – a cortege of flowers e.g. representing the environment under threat? Are the temples on huge stone structures or the remains of mountains? Is the panda happy or sad or just indifferent? Suggestions please.

RSA 3 Ade Adesina RSA (Elect), Honey, linocut, 2017, 78 x 58cm, 2017. (Medium)...

Honey by Ade Adesina

The exhibition has now closed in Edinburgh but I’m sure that it may well surface in other galleries, so watch out for it and check out other works by the artists mentioned above.

**** Update: I’ve received a comment from Ade Adesina, who states “I started working on the idea for Honey after Edinburgh Zoo acquired a panda from China. I learnt the amount of money that they have to pay yearly to have the Panda at the zoo. I just started playing with the idea of how China send pandas all over the world in return for millions of pounds. I also added my signature comments on climate change and global warming”.

Making yet another slow and fairly tortuous comeback on the bike this week, I was listening (safely) to the Word of Mouth podcast. This week’s episode featured Haggard Hawks a blog, tweet and books about obscure words and you can listen to the podcast – anywhere in the world – here. The podcast is presented by the erudite and amusing Michael Rosen, best known as a children’s author, one of whose books is shown below. The programme featured a number of words and phrases, the meaning of which is not always clear. The first word was fribble which means to “work feebly or aimlessly or to waste your time on pointless things”. So, we could say that most use of Google is fribbling? The phrase “to let the cat our of the bag” may originate in a scam in which people who bought a pig at the market and paid for the said pig, only realised the deceit when they opened the bag in which the pig was carried, and found a cat. The origin of “to raise your hackles” comes from hackles meaning the hairs on an animal’s back, which stick up when it is angry or frightened. Lastly, a schnapsidee is an idea that sounds wonderfully realistic when you are drunk but totally foolish when you are sober. Sounds familiar? Word of Mouth has many informative and entertaining episodes about the words we currently use or used to use, so put it on your list.

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One of Michael Rosen’s many books for children

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The French Table and Kalamkari exhibition

January 20, 2016

One of the highlights of our recent trip to London was going to the delightful The French Table (aka TFT) restaurant in Surbiton. We were staying nearby with relatives in Thames Ditton and we were out celebrating our nephew Sid’s 21st birthday. The staff at TFT had added fine touches to our table, including red and white ribbons round the menu, as Sid supports Southampton FC. Also, at the top of the menu, they had written “Happy 21st Birthday Sid”. We were given a warm welcome by the cheery, helpful but not intrusive staff who were willing to answer questions about the menu – see below.

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The French Table Menu

This was a menu – with the exception of the cauliflower – from which I could choose any of the dishes. To start with, my wife and I had the butternut squash crème brûlée. This was a new dish for us and it did not disappoint with the combination of the squash, the crunchy top, the flavoursome vegetables and tasty dressing. I’m going to try to make this and found a recipe (with video). Will it be as good as TFT? – unlikely but watch this space. I had the venison for main course and it was cooked to perfection – tender and pink in the middle, with a real depth of flavour. Two of the party had the monkfish which was praised for its flavour and superb accompaniments of crispy samphire and truffle froth. Zoe from TFT kindly sent me some photos of their dishes and the monkfish is shown below.

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Monkfish at The French Table

We all shared a plate of delicious desserts and my favourite was the chocolate and peanut fondant with malt ice cream. Mmm – the malt ice cream was among the best I’ve had. There are two more photos below – the rabbit terrine and cherry soufflé.

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Terrine of rabbit, ham hock, green olives and foie gras with homemade piccalilli and toasted walnut bread from The French Table

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Morello cherry soufflé with pistachio ice-cream from The French Table.

So, if you ever anywhere near the Surbiton area –  and it’s not far from London – try out this restaurant, as it’s a real find. Next time we’re at our rellies (as the Australians say) we’ll be back.

From food to art and particularly fabrics. There’s a new exhibition at Waterston House in Aberlady and it features the work of the Dundee-based group Kalamkari. The group’s title derives, as the useful handout indicated, from ” a fabric painting and dyeing technique known as ‘kalamkari’ or ‘qualamkari’. There is something for everyone in this exhibition and the standard of textile art on show here is of a very high standard. The theme is nature and this is interpreted widely by the various textile artists on show here: Jan Reid, Carol Gorrie, Maureen Shepherd, Lorna Morrison, Lyn Gourlay, Mona Clark, Morag Gray, Mary Wallace and Sheila Paterson. There are flowers and birds here, but also shorelines,fantasy dolls and abstract pieces. We will certainly return for another viewing. Mona Clark kindly sent me photos two pieces I selected from the exhibition and the two on show here – Land of the Midnight Sun by Lorna Morrison and Rockface at Lunan Bay by Morag Gray – are indicative of the quality of the overall exhibition. If you can get to see the exhibition, please do, or look out for the work of the Kalamari group in the future.

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Land of the Midnight Sun by Lorna Morrison of the Kalamkari group

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Rockface at Lunan Bay by Morag Gray of the Kalamari group

 

New wall, digging find and autumn flowers

October 10, 2015

I’ve just finished building a new stone wall. There’s quite a lot of tension involved in an amateur like me attempting to produce a finished wall that looks as if it might have been built by an expert i.e. to the untrained eye. Are there enough stones that are large enough to catch the eye. Are the different colours in the sandstone well distributed across the wall? Is there a good contrast between the rougher and the smoother stones? Is the pointing done well enough? From a personal point of view, the builder himself/herself has to be pleased with the outcome, according to my expert tutor and former qualified stonemason Ian and, while I can see faults in the wall, I’m pretty pleased with it. Robert Frost wrote “Something there is that doesn’t love a wall, / That sends the frozen-ground-swell under it,/ And spills the upper boulders in the sun,/ And makes gaps even two can pass abreast” in Mending Wall. The poem’s narrator and neighbour set about mending the wall and he sees his neighbour “Bringing a stone grasped firmly by the top / In each hand, like an old-stone savage armed”. The stone for my wall came from a local house where, possibly 100 years ago, a man from Dunbar built the wall. Now another man from Dunbar has built a new wall from the same stone.

New stone wall

New stone wall

Behind the new stone wall – on the right of the picture above – I’m digging a new patch to extend my vegetable garden. Digging this part was at times easy – as the spade cut through the soil which was newly wettened by the previous day’s downpour. At other times, I hit solid clay and occasionally my spade hit a largish stone and sent a shivering pain through my arm. One of my favourite Seamus Heaney poems is called Digging and in the poem, Heaney recalls his father digging potatoes 20 years ago ” The coarse boot nestled on the lug, the shaft/ Against the inside knee was levered firmly./ He rooted out tall tops, buried the bright edge deep/ To scatter new potatoes that we picked,/ Loving their cool hardness in our hands”. This fairly simple task is enhanced by Heaney’s words – “coarse boot” “bright deep edge” and “cool hardness”. I’m going to plant potatoes in this patch next year and will recall Heaney’s words when I dig them up. Near the end of the digging, I unearthed a coin and it turned out to be an old penny, indeed a penny from 1916. In the photos below (a clearer picture here) you see the inscription GEORGIVUS V DEI GRA BRETT OMN REX FID DEF IND EMP. In the full Latin, this is “Georgius V Dei gratia Britanniarum omnium rex, fidei defensor, India imperator” which translates as ” George the Fifth by the grace of God King of all the British, defender of faith and emperor of India” – so a modest chap was our George. On the reverse is Britannia – a female figure representing the Roman name for the area no known as the British Isles. This military looking figure suggests clearly that the British Empire is strong.

1916 penny

1916 penny

1916 penny

1916 penny

It’s clearly autumn now, with the leaves on the trees giving a final show of golden opulence before careering down to the ground. It’s also dark by 7pm. In my garden, there is decadence in the bushy lobelia and the sword lilies’ heads have shrunk. Some of the geraniums have kept their vibrant colours while other have rotted. There is still much to see as in the photos below. The sedum is at its flowering peak, the fuchsia are still producing delicate and intricate heads and the Indian summer has produced new roses. New in the garden are the cyclamen which will last over the winter and well into spring.

Sedum at its peak

Sedum at its peak

Autumnal fuchsia head

Autumnal fuchsia head

October rose

October rose

Newly planted cyclamen

Newly planted cyclamen

M C Escher, Mark Doty and garden shapes

September 25, 2015

A fascinating programme on TV this week, with Roger Penrose examining the work of one of his heroes, the artist/designer M C Escher. In the programme, which is only available to UK viewers on IPlayer. However, for those of you outside the UK, there are 4 clips from the programme (I’m hoping that you can access these). The most interesting to me was Ascending and Descending aka The never-ending staircase. When you look at this print (see below), Penrose notes that “the monks appear to be going nowhere” as the stairs are endless. Escher also produced fascinating tessellations and in another clip, Penrose points out how Escher’s design replicates the angels and devils in the print. For Penrose, this echoes his own mathematical studies of shapes and for the lay person, it presents a fascinating series of replications which seem to blend into each other. An exhibition of Escher’s work is currently on (but ends this weekend) at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art.

Escher's Ascending and Descending (Posted in accordance with fair use principles)

Escher’s Ascending and Descending (Posted in accordance with fair use principles)

The latest Poetry Book Society Choice is Deep Lane by the American poet Mark Doty. These are very personal poems and the poet covers a wide range of topics but I’m enjoying the nature-related poems best so far. In one of the seven poems entitled Deep Lane “Later a storm blows down the moraine/ crisp and depth-charged with ozone and exhilaration” and continues further on “leaves circling in air like the great curtain of bubbles/blown by the humpback to encircle the delicious schools”. In King of Fire Island, the poet tells of a deer which comes to their garden and has lost the hoof of one leg. “A hoof’s a deft accomplishment,/ that hard-sheened shoe of blue-black carbon”.

Having seen the Penrose programme and having taken more photos in the garden, I became more aware of the shapes in the photos. In the first photo, the edges of the gladiolus flower are fan-like or like the edges of a scallop shell.

Gladiolus

Gladiolus

In the 2nd photo, the bee’s wings have several different shapes within the overall shape of the wings, which look as if they might have been stuck on as an addition maybe for a fancy dress party.

Bee close up

Bee close up

In the 3rd photo, the petals of the begonia flower do seem to be replicated, as in Escher’s work but they don’t appear to have symmetricality of Escher’s angels, although there does seem to be some symmetry in the 4th photo – a close up of a hydrangea head.

Begonia flower

Begonia flower

Hydrangea head

Hydrangea head

The Beautiful Librarians, Le Tour ends and sweet peas

July 28, 2015

I’ve just finished reading The Poetry Book Society’s Choice –  The Beautiful Librarians by Sean O’Brien a professor at Newcastle University and well established British poet. For me, an educator of librarians in universities in Scotland and Australia for 34 years, the title was alluring, of course. As a member of the Poetry Book Society, I get sent 4 books a year – not chosen by me. O’Brien’s book is a mixture of what might be nostalgia and class consciousness “Scattered comrades now remember: someone stole the staffroom tin/ Where we collected for the miners, for the strike they couldn’t win”  and comic interludes such as in Old Lads at the Ramshill Hotel “.. these wobbly suitors with their grease-grey quiffs/ And suits that are older than they are”. The title poem, superbly analysed by Carol Rumens is also a nostalgic look back to when O’Brien was a student. The poem begins “The beautiful librarians are dead,/ The fairly recent graduates who sat/ Like Françoise Hardy’s shampooed sisters/ With cardigans across their shoulders/ On quiet evenings at the issue desk,/Stamping books and never looking up/ At where I stood in adoration”. The reference to Francoise Hardy is very meaningful to me because, as a teenager, I was lovestruck by Ms Hardy’s stunning looks and vertigo inducing French voice, such as in the song All Over the World. Some of the poems in this collection appeared to be very clever but lacked depth, while others were superb – try it for yourself.

The Beautiful Librarians by Sean O'Brien

The Beautiful Librarians by Sean O’Brien

So, another Tour de France has come to an end. Three weeks of aching ascents and death-defying descents has thrilled millions of people across the globe and not just cycling enthusiasts. My cycling pal John maintains that even watching the cyclists go up some the high climbs such as La Croix de Fer (video) makes his legs feel sore. It was great to have a British winner again in Chris Froome and there were many exciting finishes. I’ve been wearing my Guardian cycling T Shirts recently but I was surprised – and shocked – at so many people not knowing what the third word in the slogan (photo below) originally was. As ever, I’ve promised my self that I’ll do more hills from now on, inspired by the teams on Le Tour. I would advise you to watch this space, but …..

Le Tour de France T shirt

Le Tour de France T shirt

My wife’s running partner brought us a beautiful bunch of sweet peas freshly cut from her garden. These flowers not only have soft but attractive colours but they also have a lovely perfume. These delicate flowers do not last very long but make a lasting impression as in the photos below, and some of the pinks were replicated in a rose I saw in a garden only yesterday.

Jar of sweet peas

Jar of sweet peas

Sweet peas close up

Sweet peas close up

Rose with burgeoning buds

Rose with burgeoning buds

Lucy Newton and Aix En Provence

July 14, 2015

A new exhibition at Waterstone House, Aberlady features the artist Lucy Newton and it is a stunning collection of paintings of animals and birds. For me, there were three outstanding features of the work on show. Lucy kindly gave permission for me to include two of her paintings on the blog and they are shown below. Firstly, there was the amazing detail on her animal paintings of a badger and a fox. On both portraits, the animal’s fur is crystal clear and the hairs are delicately drawn and there is a real sense of life in the paintings. (Click on paintings/photos for best effect)

Badger by Lucy Newton

Badger by Lucy Newton

Secondly, in most of the paintings, the artist has included background which is a mixture of the realistic – grass, leaves and a tree – and the abstract, and this gives an intriguing depth to the paintings. Thirdly, in the bird portraits (and I use the word “portraits” deliberately as you get a real sense of these being “real” birds with personalities of their own) Lucy Newton uses splashes of colour which also have a realistic and an abstract quality. This exhibition is another winner for SOC and I would urge you to go and see the exhibition if you are in the area.

Fieldfare Study by Lucy Newton

Fieldfare Study by Lucy Newton

One of the delights of our trip to Marseille was visiting the beautiful town of Aix En Provence – the Aix is pronounced Ex. The town is a world away from the bustling city of Marseille and, although there are many tourists in the town, once you leave the main streets, there are many quieter side streets to wander through. Aix is well known as the home of the painter Cezanne and we went to the Musée Granet which contains a range of paintings by Cezanne but also many other artists. The ticket to the museum also allows you to visit the very impressive Chapelle des Pénitents, an old church which has been refurbished into a stunning, high-ceilinged art gallery, where there is an extensive exhibition of painters such as Cezanne, Picasso and Klee. The gallery (photo below) is on 3 floors and the interior itself is a work of art.

Musee Granet Chapelle, Aix En Provence

Musee Granet Chapelle,
Aix En Provence

Aix is an historic town and as you walk through the streets, there are many impressive squares with numerous cafes in which you can sit with a nice glass of Provence Rosé and watch the world go by – or study the concentration of chess players.

Chess players in Aix En Provence

Chess players in Aix En Provence

On our second visit to Aix, we went to the equally impressive Caumont Centre D’Art which is housed in a grand 18th century mansion. We were there  to see an excellent exhibition  of the artist Canaletto and the paintings came from galleries all over the world. At the back of the mansion, there are beautiful gardens, part of which includes an outdoor restaurant, set in a corner with a number of attractively planted jardinières, as in the photos below. We did not know about the gardens when we went to see the paintings and lunch at the Centre D’Art was a treat. If you are in Provence, Aix is a must-see.

The formal garden at Caumont Centre D'Art, Aix

The formal garden at Caumont Centre D’Art, Aix

Jardinière at Caumont Centre D'Art, Aix

Jardinière at Caumont Centre D’Art, Aix

The rose on our lunch table at Caumont Centre D'Art, Aix

The rose on our lunch table at Caumont Centre D’Art, Aix

I’ve put a slide show of photos from part of our trip on my Photopeach page (click on full screen for best effect) and it includes a delightful song by Francoise Hardy, whom I absolutely adored in my youth.

Making minestrone, Sapiens and the honeysuckle is out

May 31, 2015

I’ve been growing basil from seed in wee pots on two windowsills and there are now large leaves on both sets of plants. Basil is very easy to grow and very nutritious, with some websites claiming a huge range of benefits, which I would need to verify from other sites before believing all the claims. So, what to cook with the fresh basil? A simple search will give many suggestions but I opted for minestrone soup. There are more minestrone soup recipes online and in cookery books than there are heads on my basil plants. What they all have in common is vegetables, tomatoes and pasta – after that, it’s up to the individual. My soup, which is fairly thick and chunky consists of:

1 large leek

1 large dirty carrot

Half of a medium sized turnip (called swede outside Scotland)

2 stalks of celery

1 clove of garlic

Basil and oregano – a mixture of dried and fresh

1 tin of tomatoes

A good squeeze of tomato puree

1 litre of stock – I used a ham stock cube and a vegetable stock cube but purists might want to make their own stock

1 mug of pasta

It involves a lot of therapeutic slicing, unless you use a food processor. I like to slice the leeks and garlic finely and then slice the celery, carrots and turnip into small cubes. I sweat the leeks and garlic in margarine, having added the herbs to them, then add the rest of the vegetables. I give this a good stir for one minute and add the tomatoes and the stock, then the pasta and the puree. Bring to the boil, turn the heat down and it should cook in about 20 minutes – try the turnip to make sure. I find that it’s best to cook it one day and eat it the next day, as this deepens the flavour. It looks good with a couple of basil leaves on top – see photo below – and tastes wonderful – add some freshly grated parmesan to enhance the flavour further.

Minestrone soup

Minestrone soup

Out on my trusty Forme Longcliffe the other day, I listened (safely i.e. I could hear traffic at a distance behind me) to Start the Week which included a range of guests, but the most intriguing for me was the author of Sapiens: A Brief History of Human Kind, Yuval Noah Harari.  The author tells us that there were many species of what we call human but only homo sapiens survived, mainly due to this species’ cognitive abilities. Harari argues that our society has developed through storytelling and myth and that many of the things that people believe in e.g. money, are in fact based on shared myths. Money works because we trust each other and believe for example that a £20 note (worthless in itself) can justifiably buy us 2 bottles of Rioja. He also argued that many of the revolutions that have been seen as hugely progressive – e.g. the agricultural and industrial revolutions – were, for most people, regressive as they lost previous freedoms which they enjoyed in small communities, as they were forced to join large communities (in towns and later cities) and become subservient. Harari is often controversial and many people may find some of his arguments overly simplistic, but he raises many interesting questions in his book.

In my garden, the honeysuckle is now showing its vibrant array of colours and shapes. As the photos below show, a close up look at honeysuckle flowers could be mistaken for underwater sea plants, with their display of tentacles, or something from science fiction, e.g. other world creatures landing on earth, having a look at the strange and very unsophisticated humans – and having a real good laugh.

Honeysuckle flowers

Honeysuckle flowers

Honeysuckle flowers

Honeysuckle flowers

Appleby in Westmoreland and the Bowes Museum

April 16, 2015

We’ve just returned from a couple of days away to the northwest of England and we stayed in the former market town of Appleby in Westmoreland (good photos). This is a historic town which has a long, wide high street with a cross at either end, indicating where the market used to begin and end. St Lawrence’s church has impressive cloisters and at the other end of the steep street, there is the ruins of Appleby Castle, part of which has been turned into a conference/wedding centre. There’s a pleasant walk along the river Eden, which flows through the town and a very solid bridge. The photos below show the bridge and the spring flowers along its banks.

Appleby Bridge

Appleby Bridge

Appleby Bridge

Appleby Bridge

A highlight of our 2 day break was a visit to the Bowes Museum which was built on the edge of the town of Barnard Castle. The museum, as shown in the photo below, is a magnificent building, in the style of a French château and built by the very wealthy John Bowes and his wife Josephine, and it dominates the landscape for miles around.

The Bowes Museum

The Bowes Museum

The museum’s collections are wide ranging and they also have a series of exhibitions each year. At present, there is an excellent exhibition of drawings by the political cartoonist Gerald Scarfe. These drawings are all caricatures of Margaret Thatcher, the former British Prime Minister and are drawn very much from an anti Thatcher point of view. Those people who saw Thatcher as a saviour of Britain in the 1980s should definitely NOT visit this exhibition. Those people who saw Thatcher as more destructive than constructive will enjoy the drawings – some in colour – which satirise Thatcher and her policies. You can see a virtual tour of the exhibition here. The title Milk Snatcher refers to the Thatcher policy of stopping free milk for schools in the 1980s. The photo below is at the start of the exhibition – no photos of the drawings were allowed.

Scarfe exhibition

Scarfe exhibition

The other current exhibition is fashion-oriented and entitled Birds of Paradise. There are many exhibits showing a range of dresses and shoes and one stand out (photo below) is a black dress with wings at the back, featuring feathers from Birds of Paradise. Whether you admire this or not may depend on a) your taste and b) your sensitivity to the use of bird plumage in fashion.

Birds of Paradise dress at the Bowes Museum

Birds of Paradise dress at the Bowes Museum

Other highlights which caught my attention were a Rococo Clock and the complex metal work at the top of a staircase.

Rococo clock at Bowes Museum

Rococo clock at Bowes Museum

Ornate metalwork at Bowes Museum

Ornate metalwork at Bowes Museum

The most famous artefact in the museum is the Silver Swan automaton which is a beautiful piece of sculpture, with the swan surrounded by silver fish. At 2pm (too early for us) the swan rotates its head to music in a spectacular display. I tried to photograph the swan but the lighting made it difficult, so it’s worth while exploring the website to see close-up photos of the swan and its piscine entourage. The museum is worth spending a fair of time in, with its large art galleries containing many famous paintings and sculptures – see photo below of one of the high ceilinged galleries. If you are in the area, don’t miss it.

Bowes Museum gallery

Bowes Museum gallery

Spring day in Edinburgh and Easter Sunday walk

April 7, 2015

At last, Spring has arrived in Scotland and while the tulips, daffodils, crocuses and primroses have been out for a couple of weeks, the has been a definite lack of warmth. At the weekend, temperatures rose to an enjoyable 14 degrees. Now, obviously, if you are reading this in certain parts of the world, you may shiver at the thought of 14 degrees but for us, it’s a welcome doubling of the temperature from the last 3 weeks. On Saturday I was in Edinburgh to meet my 2 pals for a lunchtime beer or two and then we went to the football (aka soccer). It’s too painful to write about the latter but we enjoyed drinking Village Idiot real ale in Robbie’s bar. Earlier, I had a walk in the centre of town along Princes Street Gardens which have been transformed from a winter scene with an ice rink and German Market, into a spring flower showcase. There is now a profusion of daffodils, polyanthus and wallflower. The 3 photos below (taken on my phone) show two new polyanthus rings above the gardens, a view along the gardens to the west end of Princes St and a bed of pansies above the hedge lined walks in the gardens. All year round, this is a multilingual area and you hear several languages in a small stretch of the walk.

Circular polyanthus beds in Edinburgh

Circular polyanthus beds in Edinburgh

View west along Princes St Gardens

View west along Princes St Gardens

Looking down on to Princes St Gardens

Looking down on to Princes St Gardens

We woke up yesterday morning – Easter Sunday – to a bit of a haar and the harbour and most of the north sea had disappeared. It quickly cleared and we set of south to our frequent haunt of St Abbs Head, featured many times on this blog but there’s always a slightly different experience. As there was a slight east wind, we walked the circular route (photos here) around the cliffs from east to west. As it was the holiday weekend, it was much busier than normal but it’s a friendly as well as a scenic walk and most people passing each other say hello. The haar was covering the village of St Abbs but the coastal walk was clear and sunny. The first photo (click to enlarge for best effect) shows the village just peaking above the haar. We walked along the high clifftops and past rocks once again covered with guillemots. This is lambing time in Scotland and we passed at least 3 flocks of sheep, one on the steep hillside (2nd photo) and another where a mother was feeding her lamb (3rd photo).

Haar covering St Abbs village

Haar covering St Abbs village

Sheep on the hill above the gorse at St Abbs Head

Sheep on the hill above the gorse at St Abbs Head

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Robert Macfarlane, rocks and flower heads

March 20, 2015

I get The Guardian delivered 6 days a week. On Saturday, the paper comes with several sections, including The Review, which has an extended article related to literature, and I keep this to read on a Sunday morning. A recent Review article by Robert Macfarlane was one of the most interesting I’ve read for a long time. Macfarlane writes “I have long been fascinated by the relations of language and landscape – by the power of strong style and single words to shape our senses of place” and his new book, Landmarks is a gathering together of local words for place, flora and fauna from across the UK. Macfarlane seeks out the old worlds, but also the new words being coined by children. An example provided: “On Exmoor, zwer is the onomatopoeic term for “the sound made by a covey of partridges taking flight”.” Many local words have traceable ancient origins but others have just been developed, such as terms used by miners in the NE of England, a dialect known as Pitmatical or Yakka. An example from Dunbar is the very localised word for a crab – poo which is not used elsewhere in the neighbouring coastline. The most frequent example quoted in the town is that, whereas people in the posher areas of Dunbar might eat crab sandwiches, fishermen have poo paste pieces, with the word “piece” referring to a piece of bread. I urge you to read this article.

A walk along Belhaven Beach on the east side next to the golf course revealed a variety of rock formations and a variety of colours and abstract forms in the rocks. The rocks are predominantly sandstone but the more malleable texture of the sandstone has created a wide range of both colour and shape to the rock formations and individuals rocks. The first photo shows a delicately coloured sandstone pavement, the second a lichen covered rock with an attractive pale green coating, and the third a large rock with apparently random abstract lines.

Sandstone pavement on Belhaven Beach

Sandstone pavement on Belhaven Beach

Rock on Belhaven Beach

Rock on Belhaven Beach

Rock lines on Belhaven Beach

Rock lines on Belhaven Beach

It is officially spring hereabouts and the spring flowers are now making a grand entrance en masse in some parts of the town. In my garden, tete-a-tete mini daffodils, dwarf tulips and polyanthus are all showing off their resplendent colours, and the closer you can get with your camera, the more abstract the patterns of the flower centres become. I’m always trying to get the perfect close up photo, but of course, there isn’t one, as only the original can be deemed to be perfect. The photos below show the tete-a-tetes, dwarf tulip and the centre of a polyanthus.

tete-a-tetes

tete-a-tetes

Dwarf tulip

Dwarf tulip

Polyanthus centre

Polyanthus centre