Posts Tagged ‘Hibernian FC’

Visit to Glamis Castle and Promotion!

April 24, 2017

On our visit to Alyth, after our delightful stay at Tigh Na Leigh, we headed for the historic Glamis Castle. The castle and the Thane of Glamis (pr Glams) is referred to in Shakespeare’s play MacBeth but the bard’s story is set in the 11th century and the castle was not built until much later. However, you will still be told that Duncan was indeed murdered in Glamis Castle, such is the longevity of myth. Glamis is not one of Scotland’s strongly fortified castles, it’s more of a grand house, property of a range of aristocrats over the centuries. The extensive gardens are certainly worth visiting, starting with a riverside walk. On our visit, the trees were just coming into bud and some of the rhododendrons were bursting into flower. We passed this bridge, with its elegant railings (photo below) on the way into a path leading into the woods.

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Railings on a riverside walk bridge at Glamis Castle (Click to enlarge)

There are some huge trees in the woods and many of them are multi-limbed, and look as if they might consist of more than one tree. There are certainly some very elegant shapes to be seen amongst the trees. In the photo below, the sunlight on the hump-backed tree trunk enhanced the smoothness of its shape and I like the shadows on the trunk. The footpath is wide in the woods and the trees are spread out, so it’s an enjoyable walk with plenty of light.

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Trees at Glamis Castle

At the end of the woods, is the Italian Garden (good photos) which is enclosed by thick hedges and contains a number of statues, as well as “two pleached alleys of beech” shown in the photo below. Pleached is a new word to me and it means that the branches of the trees are interwoven. As you walk through this alley and look up at the entangled branches, they have  a surreal quality, like an abstract sculpture.

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Pleached alley of beech at Glamis Castle

As you approach the front of the castle, you can view the original castle and the wings and turrets built by successive owners. I don’t find it a very attractive building, as it’s rather squat and there are too many turrets but I’m probably in a minority here. I do of course like the stonework but there is no mention of the people who actually built the castle.

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Glamis Castle front

Just outside the castle, there is a modern sculpture of Macbeth’s three witches, sitting around their cauldron, chanting “Double, double toil and trouble; Fire burn, and cauldron bubble”, although you have to listen carefully to hear it. The sculptures (photo below) were made from fallen trees on the castle’s estate.

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The three witches outside Glamis Castle

We went on the tour of the castle but you can’t take photographs. However, you can see many interior pictures of the rooms – many ornately decorated and furnished, here. The tour is informative and you get to see a mixture of the old and the modern. As the late Queen Mother stayed here often as a child, there is a lot of emphasis on royalty near the end of the tour. As this is of little interest to me, I concentrated on the décor.

You might be wondering why Promotion! is in the title of this post. Those people who have had an email from me will know that the strapline at the end of the message and my signature is “It’s hard tae be a Hibee”. My older son and I are long suffering season ticket holders at Easter Road in Edinburgh, home of Hibernian FC and for the last 3 years, we have endured the humiliation of being in the 2nd tier of Scottish football (aka soccer). This all changed just over a week ago, when we were promoted back to the top division. At the end of the game, Joy was not so much unconfined but beside herself. There was what some people might describe as a religious experience as 17,000 Hibees (as we are known) sang out “Sunshine on Leith”. This rather dirge-like song by The Proclaimers (fellow Hibees) contains a rousing chorus, with “Sunshine on Leith” as the key part. This is because the football ground is in Leith (good photos), a suburb of Edinburgh – and yes – the sun really did shine on Leith as we sang. So, when I use my season ticket (below) next season, we’ll be back.

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My season ticket

 

 

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George V Park Edinburgh and bluebells

May 10, 2016

An email the other day from my pal Tam Bruce who has recently joined the world of bloggers. Tam and I went to school together when we were 5 years old and have remained friends ever since. We went to Dunbar Primary School where our teacher in P1 was Miss Johnston and in P7 it was Miss Murray. We then went on to Dunbar Grammar School with its Latin motto Non sine pulvere palma which now appears as Effort Brings Rewards. Our Latin teacher, the eccentric but inspirational Mr Jack Milne translated it as No reward without hard work. I guess the new one is more positive. In the email, Tam sent me photos he’d taken at King George V Park in Edinburgh and has allowed me to use them here. I had never heard of this park but was intrigued.

Noticeboard at King George V Park Edinubrgh

The photo above is a guide to what was The Royal Patent Gymnasium (scroll down page). This was a fascinating and probably unique facility for the public. Within the gymnasium was a huge sea serpent with ” a circular 6 foot wide ‘boat’ with room for 600 rowers”. Everything here was on a huge scale, with a see-saw for 200 people and a “velocipide” with wooden bicycles which had metal tyres – these could be cycled by 600 people. The gymnasium closed in 1879 and St Bernard’s Football (aka soccer) Club moved there in 1880.  

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St Bernard’s Football Club Edinburgh

This small football club soon grew in importance and won trophies in Scotland at the turn of the century. A new stand saw a crowd of 27,000 attend a game in which St Bernard’s beat my own football team Hibernian. By the 1940s, the club was gone. My team was formed in 1875 survived and is still a constant worry to their long suffering supporters. They are usually known as Hibs but are also called The Hibees, The Cabbage (and Ribs) and the Pen Nibs. You can tell the age of these nicknames as I doubt if most young people would have heard of a dish called Cabbage and Ribs or know what a pen nib is.

It’s May, so in East Lothian it’s bluebells time and if you know where to look, you can see  some extensive carpets of blue among the trees. We went for a walk in the woods next to Foxlake Adventures just outside Dunbar to see the bluebells there.

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Bluebells in woods near Foxlake

I like the photo above, which was taken to capture the bluebells but has incidentally also  included the strong trees and the intriguing shadows cast by them. The next photo shows the trees closer up and there’s a surprising range of colours in them to complement the bluebells.

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Bluebells in the woods near Foxlake, Dunbar

In Scotland, amongst people of a certain age (OK – older) the word bluebell brings to mind the famous accordion tune The Bluebell Polka by the famous Jimmy Shand (YouTube video). This is foot tapping music and there’s a joke in Scotland – How do you frustrate a Scotsman or Scotswoman? Nail their right foot to the floor and play the Bluebell Polka”. There’s an excellent article in The Guardian in which the author writes about the fleeting nature of the bluebell as “.. it is in a hurry. The flowers have to beat the closing over of the tree canopy” and “As soon as they are perfect, they are over. Within a couple of weeks, the entire population will be drowned..”. An often quoted poem about the flower is The Bluebell by Anne Bronte where the poet begins “A fine and subtle spirit dwells/  In every little flower” and later continues “There is a silent eloquence/  In every wild bluebell”. The poem veers towards sentimentality but contains some striking images. The following close up image of the bluebell reflects the “silent eloquence”.

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Close up of bluebell in May